Video game reviews: Super Smash Bros. For 3DS

Finally, after 6 long years, A new Smash Bros game is here (for the Nintendo 3DS of course). Does this game live up to the hype? Well let’s see as I review Super Smash Bros. for 3DS.

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With 49 characters to choose from, this game has the largest roster to date. With newcomers such as Megaman, Pac-Man, Roslina, Dark Pit, Duckhunt, Bowser JR. And more along with returning characters featuring Mario, fox, Pikachu, Samus and Link and more, this gives you a variety of characters to choose from with many fighting styles they possess.

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First, I would like to talk about the graphics and presentation. Although it is highly recommended to play this on the 3DS XL, I have it for the normal 3DS and the only difference is that you can see what is going on more better when you play and everything else is slightly bigger than the normal 3DS. The graphics are actually great and it looks better in 3D. Super Smash Bros. Brawl had the realistic approach but this game’s approach is colorful and a bit cartoonish but that is not a bad thing at all as I think this game looks better than Brawl. The game also runs at 60 FPS (frames per second) and the speed of this game is much faster than Brawl but not as fast as Melee.

The gameplay on the handheld feels as if you are playing on a normal console but everyone’s perspective will be different or the same as mines depending on how they play. The commands are responsive but however, the functions for the circle control pad can take work but try to not overuse it or else it will break. A few gameplay changes from Brawl include removing the “random tripping” mechanic. Many players were turned away when that was included in Brawl so good thing that was taken out. The grabbing of ledges has been changed to prevent edge hogging. What this means is for example, If player 1 Is hanging on the edge for their life before they are knocked off, player 2 would try to hang on the edge but the player cannot because player 1 is already there and would stay there. This has been fixed so when this happens, the players would be bounced off in favor for the other player. The swimming feature from Brawl is also removed and the neutral attacks that previously ended in an indefinite number of weak hits will now always transition into a finishing move. I always had a problem with players spamming neutral attacks like that since Super Smash Bros. Melee so I was glad that was fixed.

One thing I almost forgot to mention is that larger characters such as Bowser, King Dededee, Donkey Kong and more actually look their size compared to past games.

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There are 34 stages in the game in their normal form and their final destination form. A few of the stages feature a boss character that you would have to defeat or a character that can assist you. My only problem with the stages is that they brought back too much stages from both Melee and Brawl. Two stages to be brought back would have been find but 9 is way too much.

Now there are a lot of modes in this game to keep you busy for a long time. Those are, Classic Mode, a mode Smash Bros. Veterans know but it changed a bit. Now you can choose your path on which opponent you would like to face and there is a slot reel for rewards for you to choose before a match begins. Other modes include All Star Mode, Multi-Man Smash, Target Blast, Trophy Rust and the Home Run Contest. All of these modes you can win trophies, coins and custom parts in which I will get to. The most disappointing mode of the entire game is the Smash Run. You spend 5 minutes on this mode with 3 other players or CPU collecting power ups on the map by defeating enemies and when the time runs out, the final battle begins in either a match or an event to race to the finish. How would you like to collect power ups for strength and defense to then realize that the finial event (if it is an race to the finish), one player is very faster than everyone else and that is unfair. If the final battle is a match, you will not know if it is a team match or a different rule until it happens.

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The customization is new to the series. You can create up to 8 characters using the Mii and their styles you can choose from are gunner, brawler and sword fighter. They all can be customized by appearance and move set and stats. All of the normal characters can be customized too by changing their stats and their special moves. This is great and you can create many possibilities with this. Unlocking the moves and stay power ups take time but it is totally worth it.

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My final take on this game is that it is great for everyone to play. Although the smash run is an upset, it is still good for casual playing other than just VS. Matches. The soundtrack to this game was great too and this game fixed a lot of the issues that was in Brawl. The Wii-U version comes out later this year but this is totally worth spending your money on and at least everyone gets their own screen.

Gameplay – 4.5/5

Music- 5/5

Replay value- 5/5

Presentation and graphics- 4.5/5

Final score – 9.5/10

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Video game reviews: Destiny

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What a disappointment. Destiny isn’t a bad game, per say, but it doesn’t come anywhere close to living up to its original promise. At its core, Destiny is what Bungie likes to call a “shared world shooter.” It has the controls and mechanics of a first person shooter, the progression system and sandbox open worlds of a role playing game, and the online connectivity of an MMO. To set Destiny apart from the competition, Bungie promised that it would feature a sprawling, dynamic, and ever-evolving galaxy with a rich story that could make the game last as long as a decade. What I got instead was a largely formulaic game that I don’t foresee playing for more than a week or two.

One of Destiny’s biggest missteps is its story missions, which I expected to be the highlight of the game considering Bungie’s track record with the Halo series. Despite its rich lore, the story itself is extremely lackluster; unfinished even. By the end of the main campaign, I found myself just as confused about vague entities like The Darkness and The Traveler as I was when I first booted up the game, and I never quite got the sensation that a chapter of a long running series had come to a close. Instead, it felt more like someone had torn off the second half of an already incomprehensible and boring book. Like a season of Lost, Destiny answers few of the questions surrounding its world’s mystery, but at least Lost presented its story in a compelling way. Rather than taking advantage of the interactive medium that is video games to draw players into the world to make them feel like they are experiencing events unfold, the game takes to exposition through Peter Dinklage’s boring narrations as the Ghost (the player’s miniature levitating artificial intelligence robot companion) to tell its story. Playing through Destiny’s main campaign was essentially like playing through a sophisticated audio book – one with little to no character or plot development.

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Even more monotonous than Destiny’s story was the mission structure, which remains exactly the same for every mission from beginning to end. Missions essentially bog down to going from point A to point B, deploying the Ghost to scan or hack an alien technology, and then either going from point B to point C and deploying the Ghost again, or, usually in the final stages of a mission, fighting off a horde of enemies while the Ghost hacks into whatever system it was deployed to. That’s about it. It was fun the first few times, but this repetitive mission structure became stagnant and stale very quickly, especially throughout the course of a dozen or two hours. The only reason I stuck with the main campaign was because it was one of the best ways to level up my Guardian, but it felt like a tedious chore for the most part. Without a doubt, Destiny’s main campaign is the worst aspect of the game.

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To navigate from mission to mission, players must make use of the game’s beautifully presented galactic map, which shows accessible planets in the Solar System. Planets and missions are unlocked as players complete story missions, which further incentivizes players to complete Destiny’s boring main campaign . When a planet is selected from the galactic map, it zooms in to show a map of its sandbox game world with various map markers, each of which represent a mission. It’s only after selecting one of these markers that players will be taken to their selected planet to tackle their selected mission. Most of them are story missions, but each planet features at least one Patrol mission (which allow players to free roam a planet’s sandbox world and complete small and often tedious and boring objectives) and one Strike mission (instanced dungeons tackled with a strike team), and some planets feature high level events called Raids.

While these sandbox worlds are large in volume, I would be more thrilled if they weren’t so barren. Filling Destiny’s worlds with interactive NPCs who could tell players more about the lore and the situation of a particular planet or offer players side quests would have gone a long way into making the worlds of Destiny more compelling. These worlds do spawn enemy creatures throughout the map once in a while, but unfortunately, the enemy variety in Destiny is abysmal. Each enemy race (Fallen, Hive, Vex, and Cabal) only features a handful of creature types whose color palettes change every once in a while to indicate that they are a higher level than the ones from before. While the game does space out the introduction of each enemy race evenly, there is a long stretch of time between each introduction, and during that time, I found myself facing the same handful of enemy types over and over again. Once I did encounter a new race, it wouldn’t take long before the game showed off all the creature types of that race, and the cycle would repeat.

Despite its incomprehensible and uninteresting story, formulaic mission structure, barren game worlds, and lackluster enemy variety, the game does make some great strides when it comes to core gameplay mechanics. As you would expect from a Bungie game, gunplay is fast-paced, smooth, and satisfying. The game does only run at 30 frames per second, which may disappoint competitive players, but in my experience, that did little to detract from accurate and precise shooting. The gunplay feels even more thrilling when combined with the game’s high level of challenge. The game is not a cakewalk by any means. While it is mostly a run and gun game, players who don’t take the occasional cover or choose a strategic position from which to take out their enemies will find themselves hitting the sack often, especially because of how smart, relentless, and visceral the enemy AI is. Despite the game’s repetitive mission structure, the challenge it offers does make it satisfying to overcome each mission.

Where Destiny shines even brighter is its RPG elements. Character progression in particular is very well executed and quite addictive, making the chore of playing through story missions to level up or to obtain new items and equipment almost worthwhile. The game begins with players choosing one of three classes (Titan, Warlock, or Hunter) and customizing their race, gender, and appearance. Only the player’s class will have any major impact on gameplay; the rest are simply aesthetic choices. I was expecting character customization to be more extensive than choosing from a bunch of presets, but there are enough options to allow players to create relatively unique characters.

With each level, players will earn new skills that are unique to their subclass. Each one of the game’s three classes features two subclasses: one which is readily available from the beginning and another that unlocks at level 15. Since each subclass can equip any kind of weapon, choosing a subclass is less about filling the shoes of a pre-defined role and more about finding something that matches your playstyle. The Titan’s Striker subclass is suited players who like to run-and-gun and get up close and personal, while the Defender subclass is suited for players who like to play defensively. The Warlock’s Voidwalker subclass is suited for players who like high offense and crowd control at the sacrifice of defense, while the Sunsinger subclass are like clerics in MMORPGs: geared more towards those who prefer a support-based playstyle. Finally, the Hunter’s Gunslinger subclass are for marksmen who are all about precision shooting, while the Bladedancer subclass are for those who like to use stealth and close quarters combat to outdo their enemies. But at the end of the day, players can take advantage of each subclass’s skills any way they please, use them with any combination of weapons, and develop a style of their own. The best part is that players can switch between active skills and on the fly to mix and match ones that better suit their playstyle for certain situations. The game even allows players to switch between subclasses on the fly, which is almost unheard of. Destiny truly does offer one of the most flexible character progression systems out there.

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Leveling also influences what weapons and armors players can equip, since equipment in Destiny are only capped by the player’s level. Destiny does not feature any attributes which players can add points to after leveling like in other RPGs or MMORPGs. Instead, most of a Guardian’s power and stats are directly influenced by their equipment’s stats, so it’s vital that players obtain up-to-level equipment as soon as they can. Since equipment has such a large influence in Destiny’s character progression, finding new ones always feels like Christmas, especially since most of them look pretty cool, especially towards the higher levels. The satisfaction that comes from equipping Guardians with new gear and watching and feeling them grow more powerful, paired with the game’s flexible character progression, was one of the main reasons I kept coming back to Destiny despite its repetitive nature.

Destiny soft caps players to level 20, but players can go beyond that by equipping rare equipment that come with a stat called Light. The higher the amount of Light in a piece of gear, the more powerful it is, and the total amount of combined Light will define how many levels above 20 a Guardian is. Some equipment with Light can be found by playing missions in high difficulty after reaching level 20, but the most powerful weapons and armor can only be purchased through one of various vendors in The Tower (the game’s social and non-hostile hub). These vendors only accept one of the game’s various currencies.

Glimmer is what players will be using initially to purchase items, weapons, and armors, but eventually, they will begin to earn Vanguard Marks, Crucible Marks, Motes of Light, and Strange Coins. Vangaurd Marks can most effectively be earned by playing Strike missions in the Vanguard hub or by completing Vanguard bounties, Crucible Marks can only be earned by playing competitive multiplayer matches in the Crucible hub, Motes of Light can most effectively be earned by leveling up after reaching the level 20 soft cap, and Strange Coins can most effectively be earned by completing weekly heroic Strike missions. Earning these different currencies is an extremely slow process that involves repeating certain tasks over and over again. It’s tedious and it definitely feels like grinding, but those who can bear with it will be greatly rewarded. I do wish that the game would simply have one universal currency though. By the time I reached level 20, I felt as though I had wasted my time collecting and saving up Glimmer, as they cannot be used for anything substantial towards the end game. At least giving players the ability to convert Glimmer into other currencies, even if at a high cost, would have made a big difference.

It’s not all about cooperation though. Another way the game brings players together is through Crucible, Destiny’s competitive multiplayer hub. Crucible features four game modes: Control, Clash, Rumble, and Skirmish. There are other game modes that will become temporarily available in the coming days and months through special events, but I’ll be reviewing the game as it ships. Control is your typical point-control style game mode, Clash is essentially team deathmatch, Rumble is free-for-all deathmatch, and Skirmish is similar to team deathmatch, but it reduces team sizes from 6 to 3 while allowing players to revive fallen comrades, encouraging them to stick together. Destiny doesn’t do anything revolutionary with competitive multiplayer, but I still found it to be a lot of fun. The Guardians’ powers in particular separate Destiny’s competitive multiplayer from the competition, as they bring about an interesting new dynamic to what could have otherwise been a sterotypical multiplayer mode. The ability to use earned gear to annihilate other players is an added bonus.

The biggest praise I can give to Destiny is that it’s presentation is immaculate. Despite its lackluster story and narrative, the lore has been richly realized through incredible artistic direction and visuals. I was skeptical at first about Bungie’s intentions to mix the aesthetics of fantasy with sci-fi, but it paid off big time. The lore looks and feels like a fantasy story taking place in the future. Even more mesmerizing than the game’s visuals is its soundtrack. Destiny features some of the best orchestrated music I have listened to in a video game in a long time, and they kick in just at the right time during gameplay to provide the appropriate mood and atmosphere for certain situations. It’s easy to tell that everything about Destiny’s lore, aesthetics, and presentation has been crafted with love and care.

Despite Destiny’s beautiful presentation and polished core mechanics, its lackluster story, uninteresting worlds, and repetitive mission structure keep it from becoming legend. The game is by no means a disaster. The satisfying gunplay, the challenging missions, and addictive character progression will keep players hooked for a decent amount of time. But in its current state, there is no way this game can stay alive for 10 long years. I don’t think Bungie comprehends just how long that is, especially if they expect players to repeat the same mission structure over and over again while experiencing a story that is as incoherent as it is uninteresting. It’s hard to say what the future holds for Destiny, since the game will constantly evolve as new content is added throughout its lifespan, but as it stands, Destiny is a good game that could have been so much more.

My final rating for this game is a 7.5/10

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retro video game review: metal gear solid portable ops

Julian Cannon sneaking back on here for another video game review. This time it is Metal Gear Solid portable ops. Also follow me on twitter @julianexcalibur

Metal Gear Solid portable ops is a stealth action game released for the PlayStation portable in December 2006 in Japan and in January 2007 world wide. This was the first game to not have a numbered title since the first Metal Gear (MSX version) and many thought it was a spinoff until hideo kojima confirmed that it was Canon a few months earlier. This game is the sequel to metal gear solid 3(set in 1964) and the prequel to metal gear solid peace walker(set in 1974). In this game you are playing as big boss (naked snake) and many other characters are playable as well. Now let’s get to the review

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Story

In 1970, 6 years after the operation snake eater, the FOX unit has been disbanded by the CIA with their takeover of the group. Snake is seen in prison being interrogated by LT Cunningham about the location of the first half of the philosophers legacy that was obtained at the end of mgs3. Once the torture is finished, snake meets a young Roy Campbell for the first time and plans an escape. When they do escape, snake gets in contact with para medic and she tells him that he and major zero have been arrested for treason against the government. Snake then vows to end the former FOX unit by forming FOXHOUND with Roy Campbell.  With this new unit,they have recruited soldiers from south America as well as encountering the old ones from FOX. Some time later,snake finds Frank Jaeger (Gray Fox) and the two of them battle in a fist vs sword match. After the fight,Frank joins big boss rebellion and a character named gene was revealed to be the new leader of FOX.

To complicate matters, Gene has also convinced most of the Russian soldiers stationed at the base to join their side by simply taking over the chain of command belonging to a former Red Army unit, which was secretly stationed inside the Colombian territory. In order to complete his mission, Snake must persuade enemy soldiers to join his ranks due to the scale of his mission.


Snake and his squad defeat the top members of the FOX unit and eventually they make their way into Gene’s guesthouse. Snake learns many things on his way. Cunningham was working for the Pentagon and wanted Snake to push Gene into launching a nuke at Russia to tarnish the CIA’s reputation and to prolong the Cold War. Gene was actually aware of this plan from the beginning due to information from Ocelot. Gene really wanted to launch a nuke at America to destroy the Philosophers and to make his nation of soldiers, “Army’s Heaven”. Snake destroys an experimental model of the ICBMG (the Metal Gear model) codenamed RAXA and eventually defeats Gene, destroying the finished ICBMG model afterward. After Gene is defeated he gives Snake the funds, equipment, personnel, and all other information regarding “Army’s Heaven”. On his return home, Snake is awarded for his actions, he then establishes FOXHOUND worldwide  afterwards. Elsewhere, Ocelot kills the DCI (Director of Central Intelligence) and takes documents containing the identities of the Philosophers in an effort to “end them”.

In the post-credits epilogue, Ocelot speaks with major zero  on the phone, they are plotting to use the Legacy to fulfill their own agenda. Ocelot actually wanted the trajectory data of the nuke to point to the DCI, in order to black mail the DCI into giving Ocelot the documents containing the true identities of the Philosophers. Ocelot agrees to join his new employer’s project under the condition that Snake/Big Boss participates as well .this leads to the creation of the patriots

Gameplay

The item menu has completely changed in this game,as we are used to the box scrolling style,it is displayed like your right side of your PSP face buttons. You can also recruit soldiers in the game as well for you to rank up. Also this is the first metal gear game that you can change the campaign main character to another from your unit. You will play as snake in the beginning but along the way,you can play as Roy Campbell, major zero,python, gray fox ,para-medic and one of your soldiers.  Every character has their own abilities and have their own set of weapons.  Also if you are near death you can call for an assist from one of your teammates. The cqc feature from the previous game has been fixed since the last game you had to use about 4 buttons at a time. Portable ops also had metal gear online 1, which was released with metal gear solid 3 thrre years before.  The servers ran from January 2007-September 2012. Here you can play multiplayer against players around the world in free for all,team deathmatch,capture mission, cqc only, and more matchtypes. Other than your soldiers, you can also use Big Boss, Zero, Gray Fox,Roy Campbell, Python, Viper. And KGB soldiers . Downloadable Content included Old Snake (Solid Snake) ,Raiden, Ocelot, Meryl, and 6 maps.

Music

Portable Ops also comes with a complete score done by Norihiko Hibino, Takahiro Izutani, Yoshitaka Suzuki, Kazuma Hinnouchi, Nobuko Toda and Akihiro Honda while Kazuma Hinnouchi, Nobuko Toda and Akihiro Honda who composed the ending theme- “Calling to the Night” but was arranged by Norihiko Hibino. The ending theme’s vocals are provided by Natasha Farrow, and lyrics by Nobuko Toda. Harry Gregson-Williams was unable to help compose the game’s music due to schedule conflicts with Tony Scott’s film Deja Vu and Kojima’s Metal Gear Solid 4

Final thoughts

I have enjoyed this game since I got my hands on it in 2007 and I wish they never shut down the servers for this game. The controls are smooth and responsive for a psp game. The boss battles were quite intense including the one with Gray Fox and Gene. I would recommend anybody who follows the storyline to get this game since it is the sequel to metal gear solid 3 :snake eater. if you just want to simply read it, look up the name of the story of this game “San Hieronymo Takeover”

I give this game a final rating of 9.5/10

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kccppYUFc-4

retro video game review : Zelda II:the adventure of Link

Zelda II- THE ADVENTURE IF LINK REVIEW

Julian cannon back again for a Retro video game review ..this time it is back to the NES era. Zelda II THE ADVENTURE OF LINK.

According to the Zelda timeline released in late 2011.. this game followes the first branch (there are 3 branches) after ocarina of time and it is the final game in the first branch and the sequel to the original legend of Zelda for the NES.. the first timeline is what could happen if link does not defeat ganon in the final battle of ocarina of time.

The first thing you’ll realize when you start an actual game is that your main character, Link, can’t move up or down as he can in the prequel — instead he’s been blessed with the action-game duet of Crouching and Jumping. If you’d played the original Zelda first, you might be wondering, What’s going on here? Then you’d read the instruction booklet… and still wonder, what’s going on here? That’s right kiddies. Zelda II has shifted gameplay focus from the previous overhead view style to a more common side-scrolling style. There’s still the old overhead view, but there is little to no action involved during this view — instead, it acts as your map-traversing view, which I’ll elaborate on later. But for all of your battle needs, you’ll be spending time in the side-scrolling world. While some may be disappointed in the sudden shift of gameplay, I found it to be an added challenge, and got a kick out of it. In the original Zelda, Link could “throw his sword” the entire length of the screen when his life was at full. This time around, however, the sword blast (a) has shrunk to a puny size and (b) travels a much shorter distance, dissipating within two or three of Link’s body lengths horizontally. In addition to the shortened range, you must now learn to be adept with Link’s shield. The shift from overhead to sidescrolling action has left Link’s legs vulnerable to crouching attacks, and you must crouch to prevent Link from having his knees cut up. Of course, crouching leaves his head open, so you can imagine what would happen when you get into an intense sword fight. But that’s part of the fun in Zelda II — the immense tension that builds up when battling dreaded IronKnuckles with shields, capable of fighting at your skill level, hitting high and low in random patterns. While stabbing in the air, trying to hit your mark and get past its shield, you also must keep the warrior from penetrating your defenses, and you end up playing a hectic game of Stand-Crouch-n-Stab. The intensity level of Zelda II’s battles is the source of this game’s addictive fun factor.

However, missing from Zelda II is the vast usable inventory that Link carried in the prequel. In its stead are automatically used items, magic spells and fighting techniques for Link to search and find during his travels. Items such as the Candle and the Power Glove make their returns, but are used in different fashions. The Candle automatically lights up a dimmed area, for example, and obtaining the Power Glove turns Link’s attacks into block-crushing blows. The interesting spells and techniques, however, make the sacrifice of the large usable inventory perhaps justifiable. In addition to stabbing and poking left and right, Link eventually gains the ability to jump and stab both downwards and upwards ( a move that was eventually carried over to the super smash bros. Series)

The graphics are decent, less colorful than the original Zelda but more detailed and larger in general. Link and his enemies now stand taller, at more realistic proportions, as opposed to the old squishy deformed status of old. Enemies sport certain color schemes, indicating their strength, much like the original Zelda. The palaces also have different color schemes, and tend to appear a bit on the monocrhomatic side. However, you’ll see different columns, bricks (for the walls), headpieces portruding from walls, and statues of ironknuckles scattered about. Enemies stand out from backgrounds well enough for you to battle effectively (at least, enemies that aren’t meant to be camoflauged). The overhead map shows very simplistic yet clear definitions of mountains, plains, forests, desert, and roads.

As a result of the high difficulty, the game can take up to 14 hours to beat. Consider: you have seven palaces to conquer. Four life containers to find. Four Magic containers to find. 8 levels to build, in each stat. Tasks to complete, techniques and spells to learn. Unless you’re really good, you’ll find yourself spending somewhere around half an hour to an hour on each palace, an hour or so on Death Mountain, a couple of hours level building, etc. Either that, or this game reviewer is pretty bad with his ninja-gaming skills. It’s a tough game, and if you love a challenge, dust off that NES and get to work on this cartridge

Also new to this game is the debut of dark/shadow link. He is not that hard as he was in ocarina of time,but the battle is worth it considering that he is the final boss of this game

n the end, the completely different system of Zelda II’s gameplay didn’t bother me. I found it a refreshing change and a challenging experience. I did not know that this game existed until the Zelda collection came out in 2003 for the Nintendo gamecube. The ability to jump and defend with more precision is welcome, and all the while the game manages to retain the heavy adventure aspect that we’ve come to expect from any Zelda game released. Zelda II: The Adventures of Link, is a sometimes frustrating but overall very fun experience.

Gameplay :7

Graphics: 7.5

Difficulty : 9

Sound : 8

Replay value :8

Final score : 8.5/10

retro video game review: Metal Gear (MSX2 version)

Julian cannon back with another retro video game review. this time it is the very first metal gear for the msx2, although I did not play this until the hd collection.

in the metal gear timeline, this takes place after the upcoming metal gear solid: ground zeros and before metal gear 2 solid snake

Most gamers were introduced to Metal Gear Solid on the Playstation back in 1998. In addition to stealth gameplay that was unrivaled at the time, Metal Gear Solid also incorporated brilliant voice acting, off-beat humor, political satire and lengthy cut-scenes that drove a semi-truck worth of backstory and character development. Many of these cut-scenes, however, mentioned incidents and characters that were not included in Metal Gear Solid, leaving some gamers confused if this was an original game concept or a sequel to something nobody had heard of.

The answer is yes. To both.

The original Metal Gear was originally released for the MSX2 home computer in Japan, then later ported (albeit terribly) to the NES here in America. Metal Gear served as the game that would later set the stage for future Metal Gear Solid titles with what unfolded. Now keep in mind, Metal Gear for the MSX2 and for the NES are almost two different experiences, so I will do my best to differentiate between the two. The story line is nearly identical in both versions with some minor differences, but the main changes are in how the game plays and the overall layout of the game.

The plot is this game takes place in 1995 (in the timeline the name of the storyline is the outer heaven uprising). You are Solid Snake, a military operative working for FOXHOUND sent into a mercenary base in order to infiltrate and destroy Metal Gear, a nuclear tank that can walk. later in the game, you will find out that big boss is working as a double agent, revealing to snake that he is the commander of both outer heaven and FOXHOUND. When playing the MSX2 version, you start at the unmanned front door of the mercenary base, getting occasional messages from Big Boss (your leader) about current objectives. On the NES, you start in the middle of nowhere and must traverse through oddly placed guard dogs, mazes that make no sense and terrible ‘engrish.’

On the MSX2, you start at the front door of Outer Heaven.

The controls are responsive and actually fairly tight for its time. What confused me were the action buttons. On the NES, the B-button will punch enemies, and the A-button will use whatever weapon you have equipped (or do nothing if not equipped). The response time feels a little more reactive on the NES than the MSX2 version, but that might be the only positive aspect of the NES version. The NES port really gets plagued by level design and layout, which makes the game more frustrating and difficult than it needs to be. There are many situations where there is just enough of a gap in between a car and a bush that makes you think you can traverse through it, but you end up hitting an invisible wall and rethinking your strategy.

There are some poor logistics that exist in both versions of Metal Gear that can work in your favor and against you at the same time. Metal Gear is one of those games that reset the contents of a room once you leave it, the only exception being key items. This works great if you find an empty location that has rations (in-game health) or ammo that will infinitely respawn every time you re-enter a room, but the same tactic also applies to enemies. To make matters worse, in some rooms the enemies start their walking path right in front of the door you just exited, meaning you will enter the alert phase where waves of enemies come pouring into your screen in order to eliminate you.

On the NES, you start with this guy and his poor english. Also notice the more ‘cartoony’ color scheme.

Both games have their share of random occurrences that will either make you scratch your head in confusion or make you question what you just saw (much like everything in Metal Gear Solid 2). Starting with the NES, there are a few instances where the floor you are walking on just vanishes, killing you instantly. There is no warning, rhyme or reason for it. At first glance it looks like a logical path then the floor just goes away. In both games, there is a gas chamber that you need to progress through, but the only warning you get is once you actually have entered the room and are beginning to lose life. Big Boss actually calls you to tell you, “I nearly forgot, you need a gas mask to get through the gas chamber.”

Yeah, thanks a lot, buddy.

The inventory can be a problem in certain situations. You are allowed to carry one weapon and one accessory active at a time, so lets say you have a handgun and a card-key active. Using the gas mask example I just mentioned, you have to use the card-key to open the door leading to the gas chamber, meaning you don’t have the gas mask active, losing health in the process. You then switch to the gas mask (as unnecessarily reminded by Big Boss) and make your way through the room to the other door only to find out you need to switch out your gas mask for your card-key in order to escape the room of impending death. To summarize, you lose either way, friend-o.

Speaking of card-keys, there are nearly a dozen different cards that you need, with no distinct way to distinguish between them all. You constantly will be going through all your card-keys trying to figure out which one you need to open the door and escape the small militia shooting at you. I did some research on this, and actually found out that series creator Hideo Kojima wanted to create a sense of anxiety and panic when trying to open a door. Makes sense, but when you have a dozen different card-keys and every door looks exactly the same it’s hard to make sense of it.

Here’s my final gripe with the NES version, and I apologize now but this might be a spoiler to some, despite the fact this game has been out for a long time. The title of the game is Metal Gear, the bipedal nuclear tank you are trying to destroy. In the MSX2 version, you finally face-off against Metal Gear, then have the final confrontation against Big Boss (this shouldn’t come as a surprise to anybody). In the NES version, you fight a super computer that controls Metal Gear and its movements, then the confrontation against Big Boss. A game titled Metal Gear that doesn’t physically include Metal Gear is like a Legend of Zelda game without Zelda or an Uncharted game without Nathan Drake. For me, this was a huge let down.

One of the final bosses, Metal Gear isn’t as big of a threat as advertised, but it still freaked me out when I got this far.

I should keep in mind as sort of geek humor; the super computer in the NES version is constantly showing a blue screen. I never guessed mercenaries were using Windows 2.0 back in the day to control Metal Gear.

Even more frightening than the nuclear bipedal tank Metal gear is the blue screen of death.

Metal Gear is, despite the problems and plagues, a fun experience and worth playing. I highly recommend avoiding the NES version and going for the MSX2 adaption. The MSX2 version is included in the Metal Gear Solid HD Collection, as part of Metal Gear Solid 3. One thing I failed to mention earlier was that the NES port was not overseen by Hideo Kojima but rather a different team from within Konami, thus the varying differences. Kojima has stated that he does not like the NES version and finds it “too difficult for all the wrong reasons.” I highly recommend, if you’re a Metal Gear (Solid) fan, go buy the Metal Gear Solid HD Collection and check out the original Metal Gear and its sequel, Metal Gear 2 Solid Snake.

Retro Review: 4/5

12 days of christmas: hardest items to find in the Final Fantasy series

hello everybody, Julian cannon has returned for a new post. I am sorry that I have not been posting, I was busy with Christmas shopping and family and etc, but anyways, Christmas is here and I love it because you have your gift there and you wonder what it is. on this case, you would want to know where it is, here is my new top 10 and it is the 10 hardest items to find in the final fantasy series

10. final fantasy X-world champion

I played final fantasy 10 at least 5 times and I never wanted to do the blitz ball minigame because I hated it. but then I did it again just to get waka waka’s ultimate weapon, the world champion..without it, you will not be able to use him properly, especially during the 3rd battle against Seymour. to get this item, you literally have to play that minigame and win about 10-15 times without loosing at all. this can take a full day or week depending on how often you play. if you have the time, do something I should have done the first time and do it

9.final fantasy X- venus sigil

another one from this game but this one is extremely hard. for the venus sigil(lulu’s ultimate weapon) you will have to go to the thunder plains and doge 200 lightning bolts WITHOUT getting hit. once you get hit, it starts over and you are stuck doing it again after 199 times. that is a killer is it. I was so mad everytime I got close and I never wanted to do it again.The best way is to stay at the south part of the Thunder Plains and dodge the lightning bolts at where there is a white path near at the right side. Reach to the white path, and stand still until the lightning bolt comes down, this way is alot more faster then any other way of dodging lightning bolts. I managed to dodge the lightning bolts 200 times in about 35 minutes.

8.final fantasy  XII-2- clock master skill

this skill, or in this case item, is the most useful ability in the game period. Final fantasy XII-2 was released in January 2012 and it has got positive feedback. but I have never got this until I saw a youtube video. and that is the clock master skill. to do this you have to collect all 160 fragments in the game. that is very tough because that is very impossible without the dlc features. also some of them you will have to find the 7 paradox endings in the game after you beat the main story. what does this skill do? it speeds the ENTIRE game, including cutscenes so that is very usefiul for traveling to do more stuff and to finish battles very quick, even at the hard setting. Try to get this if you can because it will take over 100 hours to do so

7. final fantasy VIII- triple triad cards

it can be debated that the card game in final fantasy VIII is the most annoying part of the game. when you first play the minigame, you get worthless cards(umm remember the yu-gi-oh games too) but you will get stronger ones on the way. That is the keyword, “on the way”. the rules are basic but on the way, the rules change too often that you cannot get the cards. for example, the “elemental”,”plus” and “combo” rule makes you want to turn of your playstation because u will loose your strongest card. now when you win, you can get to choose what card you want to win, however, there will be new winning situations, such as whatever card you take you win. that can be the easiest and hardest task of the minigame. now the cards are used to turn into items, you can easily get everybody’s strongest weapons from these but if you keep loosing cards, then you also will loose the parts of the weapon.

6. Final fantasy V- ragnarok sword

final fantasy 5 to me is the hardest game in the series and the most broken also. I loved the job system and the very hard bosses but this stands out for all of them. somewhere in the last dungeon, there will be a treasure chest, you will not know what it is until it shows “monster in a box”. that monster is no other than shinryu. you will think of nothing until his first or second attack which is tidal wave, which will do about 7000-8500 damage to your party. you can go back there many times but he will still be there until you beat him. when you do, you will get the strongest sword in the game, which is the ragnarok. that sword doubles the damage done to an enemy, and if you have that equipped while you have the “rapid fire-spellblade-one handed” abilities, not only its the most deadly combo in the game, but you will attack for a total of 8 attacks.

5. Final fantasy XII- zodiac spear

final fantasy XII is on my top 3 of the final fantasy series. the battle system is arguably the best in the entire system, and the environments were well done. the story is pretty much law and order mix with star wars. but the only downside to XII is getting the weapons. the zodiac spear is the strongest weapon in the game and all characters can equip the spear. it also gives the user 150+ attack, 20% chance of attacking more than once, and evasion 40%. but to get this spear, you would have realized it when you were looking it up online to find out that you cannot open all the treasure chests in the game. that left so many players confused into why square enix would do that. I will not post on what chests that cannot be open because it is a long chart. but after you find out which ones it is,  the Zodiac Spear will appear in the Necrohol of Nabus.

4. final fantasy IX- Excalibur 2

Excalibur II is one of the hardest weapons to obtain in the entire Final Fantasy series, as it cannot be bought from a shop or dropped or stolen from any monster. The only way the player can obtain the Excalibur II is to make it to the game’s final dungeon, Memoria, into the room Gate to Space (where the party fights Lich) without exceeding 12 hours of playtime. Once Lich is defeated, the player must search the pillar on the right of the room to receive the sword.Passing three discs in 12 hours is a challenge, but if one is going after a “perfect” game save, there is much more that needs to be considered, such as many items, key items, and such cannot be obtained after their respective disc. This is made harder by the fact that to get one key item later on, one will need to have not missed any treasure. Another issue is achieving “perfect stats”; if one is to make the most of a character’s stat potential one must play a “level 1 game” until disc 4, when the best stat-boosting equipment becomes available. However, there are four battles in which EXP must be gained: the three battles fought in Pandemonium, and Tantarian. So players have to choose what players absorb what EXP. So “perfect stats” and the issues mentioned above make the challenge probably the hardest challenge available in Final Fantasy. For years, this challenge was thought impossible on the PAL version of the game due to the 50/60Hz conflict, but recent runs have shown that a PAL play-through is possible, but extremely difficult. Similarly, the challenge is possible in the PS-one “classics” downloaded version of the game but difficult due to the inability to skip FMVs (which adds about 2 hours to game time).

3. final fantasy XII-omega weapon

final fantasy XII is a game known in the series for being way too linear. but the after game missions kept me interested. but the one thing didn’t was getting the omega weapon. this is lightning’s strongest gunblade in the game. to get it, you would have to upgrade all of your weapons until the ultima weapon stage, then you would have to find  51x Chobham Armor, 45x Electrode, 28x Crystal Oscillator, 6x Particle Accelerator, 2x Trapezohedron. all in which will take hours and hours of battles or 5 star missions. you can buy these things but one item each is over 900,00 gil and you would have to transfer from different locations to get the rest of them for the same price. but anyways, this blade has a quick stagger ability, which means after the stagger bar goes up to 50%, it will auto stagger after that poiny, leaving you to do some pretty impressive damage every hit.

2. final fantasy VII-omnislash

this game is widely considered the most overrated video game of all time..and at some points I do agree. final fantasy VII is not on my favorite list but it is still a great game. but getting cloud’s level 4 and final limit break omnislash is a real pain in the ass. you would have to go to the battle square at that carnival and try to get 32000 points in total. that seems easy but you would have to go through stage fights( just like the 100 floors in paper Mario-the thousand year door) and it gets tough every time. if you do not want to get the move, then you will have to wait for the final battle( after safer sephiroth) to use the move. recently, the pc version that was re-released this year gave you an achievement for learning the move for 200 game points, that means you would have to go to the battle square to actually learn the move

1. final fantasy IV- pink tail

final fantasy IV was released in 1991, and since that release and remakes on various systems, I have never ever got the pink tail. and I bet nobody else got it either. to get this you will have to defeat a flan princess. seems ok at first but you will have to wait for the flan to drop the item. but it does not!!!. I have read that it has a 1/64 chance of dropping the item, which means it can take you hours or even months to get this item. which also meand that you will have to battle them in groups again and again until you get it which can be a real pain in the ass. while you are doing this, you will realize the pattern after every battle but the ratio starts over again for some reason. this issue was never fixed until the psp release of final fantasy IV-the complete collection. with this item, you will trade it to a blacksmith for adamant armor. not only that it is the strongest armor in the game, it can be equipped to any party member despite their character class. also the longer your character does not do an action, the more the defense will rise during battle

31 days of Halloween: retro video game review:Zombies ate my neighbors

I am back again with another retro video game review. this time is one of my favorites and a cult classic, zombies ate my neighbors

also follow me on twitter on your thoughts @julianexcalibur

Who doesn’t love a good campy horror flick every now and then? With Lucas Art’s Zombies Ate My Neighbors, you may never have to watch another one!

Just look at the premise of the game: Monsters are running amok in the neighborhood and it is up to two kids armed with squirt guns to stop them! It may sound cliche’, but that feeling will soon be discarded once you begin playing and discovering what a triumph the game design is!

At the start of the game you can choose between two kids; a boy and a girl. Aside from the look of the character, there is no inherent advantage to picking either of them, so just go with want you want. From there you are dropped in the first neighborhood to begin your quest of saving as many neighbors as possible. The game controls marvelously, and you will never once have a problem doing what you want once you figure out how to sort items! They even give you a radar to help in locating the neighbors which you can toggle on and off by hitting your trigger buttons.

It’s a good thing too! Ten of your neighbors ranging from mean teachers to helpless babies are scattered throughout each level. Your goal is to get to them before the monsters do. This may sound simple until you realize that if a neighbor is killed then you lose that neighbor FOR THE REST OF THE GAME! That might be a problem since the game has over 50 levels to keep them alive through, and eventually you would be down to one. Except the game developers were way ahead of us on that one! The fix was to award an extra neighbor for every 40,000 points you score! And since you will be scoring a TON of points throughout the game most players will be fine as long as you don’t mess up TOO badly.

On the other hand, that doesn’t mean that the game is a cake walk, either. The monster horde is out for your blood (or the neighbors! They’re not picky)! There’s the titular zombies, the masked killer, the evil dolls, the vampires, the werewolves… put it this way: If its been in a horror film, it will be in this game! It is shocking how much content they managed to stuff in a game that is over 15 years old! Each monster acts differently than its brethren, with different patterns, aggressiveness, and weaknesses, and you’ll have to learn each one’s intricacies in order to survive!

That is what the weapons are for! Zombie’s myriad of weapons and items are pure bliss, adding yet another layer of content into an already stuffed game. I love how the game uses things typical of suburbia and turns them into a viable arsenal. Squirt guns filled with holy water act as a pistol. Shaken-up Cola cans act as grenades that can be hurled over walls. Bazookas (Yes, bazookas!) dropped by military can be used to blow down obstacles such as hedges and walls. Every weapon and item has a purpose and add strategy to the game, but it is the various ways that the weapons interact with the monsters that steal the show. Silverware one-shot werewolves! Weed-Whackers one-shot plant monsters! POPSICLES ONE-SHOT BLOBS!! If you are a horror aficionado, you will have a distinct advantage here since it is obvious that this was a labor of love from a development team that loved horror movies!

It all comes together beautifully. Levels are incredibly detailed, and as with the monsters and weapons, it’s the small things that make the difference. Need to get in a house? You can use a key. Or you could blow the door open with a bazooka! Or you could smash it down as a monster using a special potion!

Do you want to explore, or just rescue your neighbors and move on? It is in these moments that the game ceases to be good and becomes extraordinary. My favorite example is the hedge maze in level 3. Viable options include turning into a monster and killing all seven chainsaw maniacs or using a bazooka and blowing holes in both walls AND maniacs in order to fast-track to your neighbors. Or you could let the maniacs cut a path for you, luring them into making shortcuts for you before breaking out the fire extinguishers and decoy clowns to slow them down! The possibilities are endless!

Did I mention that you can do all of this WITH TWO PLAYERS? Bringing along a buddy makes for two times the fun, and makes it more likely that you can finish the game in one sitting. Make no mistake: THAT IS THE WAY IT IS MEANT TO BE PLAYED! Zombies features a password system that punishes you for using it by stripping you of your items. If you have to use a password then you start from the later levels with just a squirt gun and a first-aid kit! I would normally chalk this up to bad game design, but it almost seems deliberate as a way to challenge more advanced players. I think that they expected veterans to use the passwords to skip ahead and try their luck at some of the punishing later levels with a limited inventory.

As for graphics and sound… The game cannot stand toe-to toe with the SNES’ best, but I don’t think it’s supposed to. The graphics get the job done and do a great job of painting a varied landscape. Animation is great with unique animations for all neighbors and monsters, not to mention the kids which are very expressive. This may explain why the graphics are a little toned down, and I consider it a fair trade. Sound-wise the game is fantastic. The soundtrack may repeat too often, but the tracks that are there are all mood-setters with my personal favorites being Dr. Tongue’s Castle and the Baby Theme. Sound effects are also varied and used to great effect, from the roaring of a chainsaw to the screaming cries of the neighbors as they are spirited away to the next world.

Overall, I cannot praise this game enough! That is why I am always confused that more gamers have not heard of this game. It sold reasonably well but seems to be forgotten among modern gamers. It was only recently that it clicked into place! I was playing Dead Rising and bitching to a friend about how clunky it was when memories of this game came flooding back to me. Zombies was a game before its time, and nothing makes that clearer than the zombie-obsessed society of the modern age! Dead Rising, Left 4 Dead, The Walking Dead, The Zombie Survival Guide… Even Call of Duty has been invaded by the undead! This game combines EVERYTHING appealing about horror films, ties it to solid arcade action, and then throws in some trademark Lucas Arts humor. The final result is a fresh and addictive title that still holds up to this day! That is why I am officially using this platform to call for Konami to make the sequel that ZAMN deserves!!

They might as well do something while they are busy doing nothing…

Retro video game review:the legend of Zelda, a link to the past

If you never experienced A Link to the Past, or if you didn’t experience it when it first came out over a decade ago, you might not get what the big deal is about this title. For those of you who were lucky enough to get the opportunity to play A Link to the Past, you probably would agree it is a wonderful game, especially considering when it came out.Also to point this out, according to the zelda timeline, this game takes place right after the ocarina of ime,in the timeline, it follows link in the path that branches to “the hero of time is defeated”

Gameplay

At heart, A Link to the Past is just a blend of the original Legend of Zelda with a dash of The Adventure of Link. You navigate Link through Hyrule and the dungeons via a top-down view and choose your equipment via an item sub-menu. You can initially explore much of Hyrule, but to progress on to later areas, you must aquire new items which you get from the dungeons. The Super Nintendo allowed for a much more complex game system, which can be seen in the vast amount of items Link can utilize, the enormous dungeons with multiple levels, the plethora of enemies on screen attacking Link and the challenge of tough puzzles.
Just start with Link’s primary weapon, the sword. Link can now use it in so many ways; he can swing it normally, he can charge it up to unleash a spin attack, he can hold it out to poke at things, he can dash with it and he can shoot out swirling lasers from it. Many of the classic items made a return, like the boomerang, bombs and bow and arrows, but some of the new ones became staples of the series. Who can forget the Hookshot, the Bombos Medallion, the Magic Cape or the Bug-Catching Net?

The overworld is laid out in a way where Link can initially peak around in every single area, but he can’t necessarily access all he sees. Boulders block his path in the mountains, while stone statues barricade the way into the Desert Palace. I wonder how many people got stuck trying to reach the Tower of Hera, a puzzle which forces the player to finally enter the Dark World for the first time. Besides the essentials of the overworld, there are tons of secrets hidden throughout the land. Heart containers, rupee caves and fairy fountains are aplenty in Hyrule.
However, the true beauty of the game comes from the dungeons. Masterfully designed, and probably unmatched even today, the dungeons in A Link to the Past were both challenging and numerous. More than just pushing blocks, killing all the enemies or bombing a wall like in the previous installment, A Link to the Past made the player truly think in order to progress. Items had to be used to their full potential in order to advance onward. Those lucky enough to survive the dungeons were rewarded with extremely awesome boss battles. You may have heard this already, but each boss truly feels unique.

The ease in which you control Link is the crux of this masterpiece. If you played the original installment, you already know how to operate the sword and your special item. Additionally, the extra buttons are put to good use. The A Button will later on allow you to utilize the Pegasus Shoes, an item which makes Link dash at full speed. Link could also access a graphic map instead of a plain and blocky grid-map. Bottles allowed Link to store items like magic potion or fairies. The hookshot could be used to pull Link across long distances, or pull distant things to him. Bombs could not only blast enemies and walls, they could blast Link and hurt him (which is actually a blessing if you know how to exploit it). All future Zelda games owe their gameplay to this installment.

Graphics

A Link to the Past was made relatively early on in the life cycle of the Super Nintendo, which many would label as a first-generation title. Even still, the graphical achievement in this game was superb. The SNES showed off its ability to render layers and scale objects. This is crucial for all of the dungeons and several areas of the overworld. The animations of Link as he traverses Hyrule makes it hard to believe how convincing he looked in the NES games. Enemies came to life; just knock a guard off the edge into a pit.
The overworld truly felt like it flowed together extremely well, as opposed to the blocky nature of the previous installments, in which the world radically changed at the advancement of a single screen. Players will also notice that even though the screen “scrolls over” at edges, that the screens themselves will actively scroll with Link to give the effect of a larger on-screen area. The graphical power of the SNES also allowed for NPCs to exist in the game, along with a sprawling town in the form of Kakariko. Hyrule felt alive.

In sharp contrast, the dungeons in the games were each very unique and had a very dark and grim feel. The Desert Palace had sand across much of the floor. The Swamp Ruins had water running through it. The Ice Palace gave our hero trouble as he slid across the slippery surfaces. The entire game just felt so massive and alive thanks to the excellent work the graphical design team did for A Link to the Past. Sure, by today’s standards, Four Swords Adventures and The Minish Cap make A Link to the Past look a bit dated. But not that dates. Even amongst next-generation two-dimensional games, A Link to the Past still holds its own.

Audio

Sure, The Legend of Zelda established the famous Zelda theme. But it was A Link to the Past that established nearly every other great Zelda tune fans have come to love. Would you like us to list off some of the great hits? How about the soothing melody of Kakariko Village, the powerful charge of the Light World theme (yes, it’s just another version of the original game’s overworld theme, but it still rocks), the elegance of the Fairy Fountain theme, the majesty of Hyrule Castle’s them or the power of the Dark World theme?
Just about every song in this game went on to become a fan favorite, and many of them have been used over, and over … and over again in later installments. But it’s not just the soundtrack. It’s the sound-scape. The sound effects in this game were pretty good. Though the sound of Link swinging his sword sounded a bit goofy, and the loud bang made when dashing into a wall is a bit overexaggerated, many of the other effects were nice. Take that sword and tap it against wall. Notice the ping it makes, especially when you do it to a weaker section of the wall with a crack. Blows against armored foes made a clang. Arrows impacting against a surface made the pop you would expect.

Alright, so maybe by today’s standards, the effects are a bit weird and unrealistic. But this is a fantasy game, and one that is over a decade old. I don’t think I’ve ever heard somebody tell me that the sounds in the game annoyed them or detracted from the game at all. It is just too bad that wit the re-release on GameBoy Advance a few years ago, Nintendo had to add in those horrific yells of Young Link from Ocarina of Time. Even still, the sounds give the game a fantasy tone, which is sufficient.

Challenge, Fun and Replay Value

A Link to the Past probably will frustrate gamers who grew up in the three-dimensional era, but those who somehow missed this gem the first time around who are familiar with two-dimensional adventure games should really find themselves at home with this title. Sure, some of the puzzles will make your brain hurt or cause you to check GameFAQs, but that’s pretty much a requisite (well, at least once in each game) of a Zelda title. The boss battles, should you actually find out the key to their weakness (cough, dungeon items, cough), become a bit more manageable.
But this isn’t like the newer titles, in which Link can withstand one-hundred blows before dying. Some bosses will take down Link in as little as two-to-three blows. So be prepared to try again frequently on most dungeons. However, the challenge never gets to the point of frustration, and most will find the challenge a welcoming element for those pampered by the built-in game aids in future installments. Also, unlike its three-dimensional brothers, doing everything in A Link to the Past won’t take up the rest of your lifetime.

Simply collecting the extra heart containers, finding all the upgrades and locating all the items is the only requisite of this title. No trophy or statue hunting. No excessive heart container collecting. No Skulltula or Mask collecting. Everything is very manageable and very rewarding for the time it takes to accomplish. The pace of play is very good, with the story developed very loosely in game to drive the player on.

Final Verdict

This is like the Bible of Zelda. If you haven’t played it, you don’t know Zelda. If you have, you get it. The graphics and two-dimensional gameplay may turn off fans who grew up on Ocarina of Time (or joined the bandwagon then). But if you liked The Minish Cap, you will love this game. If you can get over your graphic obsession, you will find that A Link to the Past is truly a great game, and you will finally understand why fans frequently call out its name when the discussion of best game ever is thrown around.

Gameplay: 10.0
Graphics: 9.5
Sound: 8.0
Challenge, Fun and Replay Value: 9.0
Final Score: 9.1