Video Game Review: Final Fantasy Type-0 HD

While most RPG gamers are waiting for the upcoming Final Fantasy XV video game, Square-Enix released a different FF game to the tune of Final Fantasy Type-0 HD. A gussied-up version of a 2011 PSP game by the same name, Type-0 HD brings the presentation of the portable original to a high definition standard so that PlayStation 4 and Xbox One owners can experience the game on their HDTVs.

  

 The game is part of Square-Enix’s Fabula Nova Crystallis Final Fantasy sub-series and revolves around Class Zero, an elite class of recent recruits who, in addition to wielding a variety of weapons, have access to incredible magics and abilities. Every member of the class are made unique, though only a few are actually memorable by any degree. Those worth making note of include starting character Ace who attacks using a deck of enchanted cards and childhood friends Machina and Rem who take up the role of the group’s outsiders. Beyond those three, everyone else in the group fall into the trappings of your typical schoolyard archetypes including the brainiac, the tough guy, and the class clown.

   

 

Each member of the class has his or her own unique weapon. Unlike with most Final Fantasygames, however, these weapons can’t be swapped out for others or used by other characters. Rather, each character uses the same weapon all the game through. They can be upgraded as the game goes on, thankfully, so at least there’s that.

Parties are comprised of three active characters with the player controlling one in specific while the other two are A.I. controlled. The user-controlled character can be hot-swapped at the press of a button with either of the other two, which adds a bit of flexibility to the active (that is, non turn-based) gameplay. Furthermore, other characters can be put into reserve and swapped out completely at the game’s various save points. Even with all of the versatility provided to the player thanks to the large cast of playable characters, though, there are often times when it seems like the combination of active characters simply isn’t quite right for the situation at hand.

The game flows in a very structured and deliberate manner. Players are given a set of missions that tend to involve running through the game’s maps (which, by the way, tend to be comprised of a number of disappointingly small areas linked together), combating the occasional over-powered boss character, and helping the overall war effort as established in the game’s rather enthralling opening sequence.


As should be expected from a JRPG, Type-0 HD offers a good amount of side content outside of the main mission set. They way this side content is set up, however, is a tad disappointing. Accessible only during the class’ periods of “free time”, missions can be undertaken one at a time and provide players with items upon completion. While early on this seems just fine, as players progress into later parts of the game and one’s free time gets more valuable they prove to be irrelevant distractions at best.

Visually, it’s pretty easy to tell that this game wasn’t made natively for the current generation consoles. Still, as a prettied-up port the overall presentation is pretty good. Cut scenes are, in a word, amazing. Gameplay visuals, however, are a bit lacking. While the graphics themselves aren’t half bad, there are camera issues that really get in the way of things. These issues range from providing players with poor views of the action to jittering in confined spaces.

   

 

Thankfully, many of Type-0 HD‘s visual shortcomings can be overlooked thanks to the intriguing story that’s quite a bit darker and more mature than that of your average Final Fantasy game. Core gameplay isn’t ideal thanks to some control gripes dealing with enemy targeting, but it can carry its own. There is also quite a lot of content and players can expect to experience hours upon hours worth of gameplay, which is somewhat surprising considering the game was originally released for a handheld system.

For JRPG and Final Fantasy fans, Final Fantasy Type-0 HD is well worth playing. For those who want to hold off until FFXVeventually comes out, please take note than Type-0 HD comes bundled with a playable demo of the upcoming game.

final rating- 8.4/10

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Video Game Reviews: The Legend Of Zelda: Majora’s Mask 3D

Ever since Ocarina of Time 3D was announced, Zelda fans have been clamoring for a similar treatment to cult favorite Majora’s Mask. So, after 15 years since its initial release, Majora’s Mask 3D is now in the hands of the public. Does it live up to the astounding amount of hype?

Well, yes and no. I am Julian Cannon and this will be my review of the game. 



Don’t lose your head– as a remake, the game is as good as can be asked. The graphical updates are wonderful and add an incredible amount of depth to the world of Termina as well as those living in it. For example, one of my favorite details is that in the Clock Town Bomb Shop, there is a small note on the wall theorizing about creating a rocket to the moon using bomb-powered flight. This note was in the original game, but now added to the wall are a series of sketches labeling their plan to get the rocket to the moon and back. It’s a small detail but the amount of charm it adds to the game is immeasurable. These details are especially important for a game like Majora’s Mask– the depth of Majora’s Mask comes from the minutiae of each NPC and the settings they’re in, so adding these small details only serve to improve the game.

Alongside the graphical updates, there have also been a lot of touch-ups to Majora’s Maskgameplay structure. The changes overall are minor, but they serve to help pace the game a lot better and make it much more manageable for those new to Majora’s Mask. In particular, the Bomber’s Notebook has been changed drastically from what it was in the N64 version. Rather than just showing the schedules of 30 different NPCs, the Bomber’s Notebook now keeps track of every side-quest in the game. There is still a schedule for the time-sensitive side-quests, and more NPCs have been added to the schedule for completion’s sake, but otherwise you just get a list of side-quests that are either finished, ongoing, or something you’ve heard about from another source such as the Bombers.

While it may seem like a lot to juggle, it’s very well thought-out and makes it clear what side-quests you’re in the middle of, how far you’ve progressed in them, and what more you need to do to complete the side-quests. This new organization doesn’t really do anything different to the side-quests themselves, but it makes completing them much more manageable and more entertaining because no matter what you’re doing it feels like you’re getting something accomplished.

Other than that any changes to Majora’s Mask gameplay are even more minor than that. Some side-quests will have new requirements to advance, such as needing the Goron’s Mask to start Anju and Kafei’s side-quest; other side-quests and locations have been moved around to make them more useful, such as the Stone Mask now being located in Pirate’s Fortress and the Great Fairy in Woodfall giving you a larger magic bar rather than the advanced spin attack. The best change is to the Song of Double Time; instead of fast-forwarding you to the next 12-hour block, you can now choose which hour to specifically fast forward to in the day that you are on currently. This eliminates a lot of the waiting for events that was present in the N64 version and makes the game a lot smoother and more palatable both to those who found the N64 game repetitive and newcomers who have never played Majora’s Mask before. However, all of these changes do not mean that Majora’s Mask is now a perfect package.



As was the case in the N64 version, the Great Bay area remains completely un-fun, but a few changes to its structure actually serve to make it worse. The main change is that swimming with the Zora Mask on is completely different. Whereas Zora Link would always swim at the same speed in the N64 version, there is now a great difference in speed between swimming normally and using the Magic Power attack. Great Bay is by no means a small zone, and that was the reasoning behind  swimming as a Zora being so quick on the N64. The speed was put into place so that you would be more inclined to use the Zora Mask to get through the zone quickly.

In the remake to get through the zone at the same speed you need to use a great amount of Magic Power, and using that much Magic just to get from point A to point B is a complete waste. The worst part about this now is that no matter how you swim as a Zora, it is no longer as satisfying as it was in the original Majora’s Mask. This defeats the purpose entirely of being a Zora, and many will question why the change was added in the first place.



Every other aspect of Great Bay remains more or less the same. The Zora egg fetch quest is still un-fun because it still feels like padding to make the game longer. You need to make two trips between Pirate’s Fortress and Pinnacle Rock at the very least, and that’s assuming that you got four bottles before beginning the quest in the first place. If you didn’t get four bottles, you’ll need to make at least two trips to Pirate’s Fortress as well as a trip to Pinnacle Rock…and so on. No matter how many bottles you go into the quest with, the quest still feels like a slog; the mandatory stealthiness required through Pirate’s Fortress is finicky and uninteresting. It becomes far too easy if you use the Stone Mask to make yourself invisible, which the game encourages you to do by placing the person who hands it out in Pirate’s Fortress itself. It’s a pain no matter how you approach it, and the fact that this was left almost completely unchanged is completely baffling.

Even more baffling than that is the fact that Great Bay Temple also has remained almost completely unchanged compared to the N64 version. In the Ocarina of Time remake, the Water Temple had a very clear pathway lit up to show you where the next water changing switch was. It was a minor change, just like any change in Majora’s Mask, but it helped make the dungeon much more navigable. An attempt was made to do something similar with Great Bay Temple; pipes that had water flowing through them now light up. In theory, this would mean that following unlit pipes would lead you to where you need to go next…but in practice this did not work. Great Bay Temple still looks largely the same until you’re too far in to prevent having to backtrack through several rooms, and there are lots of unseen hookshot points that make the dungeon much less sensible than it needed to be. It’s really disappointing, because of all the things many expected them to change in Majora’s Mask, Great Bay Temple’s structure was at the top of the list.



Remakes and remasters are a chance to listen to fans and make requested changes (as long as they’re within reason). Leaving the Great Bay Temple largely as is, when it was a known trouble area, displays a rather large missed opportunity. Considering the amount of polish that went into other areas of the game it’s almost as if they were unwilling to deal with this large, and almost universally disliked section of the game. Not just that, but actively making the zone worse by radically changing how Zora Link functioned seems like a huge step back in comparison with the rest of the small positive changes that the game made.

All of that having been said, issues with Great Bay are relatively small frustrations in the face of the rest of the product. There is so much that Majora’s Mask has to offer, and almost all of it outshines any of the game’s shortcomings. The unchanged Great Bay serves as a reminder that Majora’s Mask was not a perfect game when it was released, and it is still not a perfect game now. What Majora’s Mask is, however, is a game that has stood well against the test of time, and will continue to stand out as the most interesting Legend of Zelda title to date. Majora’s Mask is not to be missed, for veteran or newcomer alike, and deserves a spot in your 3DS.

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The Order 1886 Review

Third-Person shooter games have come a very long way and The Order 1886 is now part of my collection. Do I think this game is a hit, or do I think this game is a miss? Will this be another game that was just hype for the last 3 years? I am Julian Cannon and I am reviewing The Order 1886 for the Playstation 4.

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For starters, the atmosphere of this game is by far one of the best I’ve seen in an third-person shooter game. The environments and areas in the alternate history of London puts me in the mood to see what else there will be to discover. I give the developers credit for the 4 years spent on making this game from ground up.

The main conflict is between an old order of knights who are keeping the world safe from half humans and half beast like monsters. Hundreds of years later, King Arthur and the Knights of the Roundtable have their battle and struggle with the half breeds during the industrial revolution. During this time, many factories and engineers worked on technology far above their time.

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The voice acting exceeded my expectations as if I felt like I was watching an British empire like film that took place in that decade from my prospective. Sir Galahad, the main character, reminded me of actors who rare always in the bad mood in action shows such as 24, CSI Miami and Law and Order. Sir Perceval, the mentor of Galahad, had a great role along with Lady Igraine, who sometimes annoyed me but her role served its purpose.

However, the gameplay I had mixed feelings with but I will start with saying that the weapons for this game at that time period are very accurate. You cannot play this third-person shooter and expect every single weapon in the game to be used the same way in other games of this type. It took me a while to get used to the mechanics and it was worth learning. The game’s length is between 6-7 hours but I do not speed run video games at all. I love to take my time with them and that is what I did with this game since I have a normal schedule like every hardworking man and woman. The QuickTime events I feel should have not been implemented too often as I felt that it was not needed for most of the events. Is the game too linear? Yes but how many games are linear these days? Quality is what matters in my book.

After all is said, I really did enjoy the game besides a few gameplay features that needed to be balanced. The ending left me wondering if a sequel will be made in the future and I hope there will be a sequel. My rating for this game is 8.2/10

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Pros-awesome graphics, atmosphere, cutscenes and characters, historical references, puzzle solving, cover-gunplay

Cons-some gameplay features needed to be fixed, if you are not into long cutscenes, then this is not for you.

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Video Game Reviews: WWE 2K15

With the last gen versions of WWE 2K15 (Playstation 3/Xbox 360) getting a universal negative reception, can the current gen versions (PS4/Xbox One) deliver the hype? I am Julian Cannon and I am reviewing the Playstation 4 version of WWE 2K15.

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This game looks more close to real life than ever this time. From the camera angles to the lighting and the arenas along with the detailed look on the superstars and divas, this is the best looking WWE game to date. Most of the superstars and divas had their entire body scanned for the game. The ring was even scanned so it can look exactly like it is on TV. Everything may look a little smaller than the previous games but it will grow on you in time.

The roster is actually a huge let down. Compare the roster on last year’s WWE 2K14 to this game and you will notice that last year’s game had the better roster. It is good to see the addition of new NXT superstars such as Sami Zayn, Adrian Nevelle, Bo Dallas, Rusev and more, the rest of the roster is the weakest since Smackdown vs. Raw 2008. Many of the superstars are very outdated with their attires and music. Most notably, Dean Ambrose and Seth Rollins have their shield attire and music. However there are a few legends in the roster such as Booker T, Rob Van Dam, Kevin Nash, Ultimate Warrior and some good ones including The Wyatt Family, The Usos, Xavier Woods, Big E and more but some of the superstars in the game are exact copies of themselves (for example, current Batista and retro Batista should be just one character with a costume change instead of two separate characters).

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The gameplay has changed drastically for this year’s game. A new chain wrestling mini-game has been implemented to make matches play out more realistically. Pressing the grapple button at the beginning of the match will initiate a collar-and-elbow tie up. From there, each opponent will press one of three face buttons to place their opponent into a side headlock, a wrist lock or a waist lock with a rock-paper-scissors style outcome. (Headlock beats Wrist lock, Wrist lock beats Waist lock, Waist lock beats Headlock.) Whomever wins will place their opponent in the corresponding hold while both players rotate the right analog stick to find a “sweet spot”. If the attacker finds it first, they’ll perform a move, if the defender finds it first, they’ll gain the upper hand. Additionally, the attacking wrestler can strike or wrench the opponent’s limb, making it harder for them to find the sweet spot. This mini-game only happens 2-3 times during the match and can be turned off via the options menu. Strikes have returned to their normal speed with improved collision and selling animations from the opponent. Unlike in previous games, superstars will not stand up immediately after taking a bump or slam, the player must rotate the right analog stick in order to stand up.

The stamina system returns in this game but it has changed as well. It is a three-tier stamina meter which controls the pace of a match. Each move that is performed, especially striking and running, will drain the stamina meter. During the first tier, the wrestler will be full of energy and perform moves easily. During the second tier, the wrestler will begin to slow down. In the third tier, the wrestler will be completely exhausted, even being unable to perform their finishing moves should it drop too low. Although the stamina meter cannot be turned off, stamina will slowly regenerate as long as a meter is not depleted and can be adjusted to drain more slowly. The game’s submission system has been revamped. The “Breaking Point” submission system has been replaced with a two part circular gauge. The mechanic of the system remains mostly the same, but players only have to mash a single button rather than all four.

Wake-up taunt finishers are now known as “Charged Finishers” which combines the taunt & finisher into a single animation by pressing the finisher button when the opponent is grounded. Signature moves can now be stored as well. Catch and Catapult finishers have also returned. Both fighting styles and skill sets have been brought in to ensure that the characters behave more like their real-life counterparts. For example, high flyers like Rey Mysterio will not do power moves and will focus on diving and springboard moves while giants like Big Show cannot climb the turnbuckle and will focus on power moves. Superstars who cannot climb to the top rope can climb to the second rope and deliver moves such as Bret Hart’s elbow drop or Big Show’s slingshot body splash. The gameplay changes take some time to get used to so you will have to play around with it for a few times but if you do not like the new controls, you can revert to the controls from last year’s game.

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The 2K Showcase focuses on two rivalries. One of them focuses on the Triple H and Shawn Michaels feud which began in SummerSlam 2002 and ended in Bad Blood 2004 and the other is the CM Punk and John Cena feud that began in the summer of 2011 and ended in February 2013. I personally liked the HHH/HBK feud more than Punk/Cena but there should have been more feuds added to this mode such as Rock/Austin, Hulk Hogan/Randy Savage, Bret Hart/Kevin Nash and more that can fill up this mode but choosing only two out of many raises more questions than answers. The way you play these feuds is the same dragging style that was featured since WWE 13. Fight until a certain part of the body changes to red, do objectives, cutscene and repeat. I felt that this style of cut and paste should have not happened in this game. Two games to have this style is enough, three is overdoing it.

The MyCareer mode is the best mode in the entire game period. You take your created superstar and you build his career (cannot create divas on this version of the game). You start all the way at the bottom in the performance center, then to NXT. After you reach the ranks there, you will then head on to Raw and Smackdown and eventually to main event WrestleMania and become a WWE Hall of Famer. During this mode, whatever you do, outcomes in the experience such as wrestling as a Babyface or heel, forming alliances, and etc. there is a never ending cycle to this so it can get repetitive down the line. Also, There is a 1-5 star match rating system that will rate matches based on technique, pacing and momentum, with squash matches getting lower ratings and back-and-forth matches getting higher ratings.

There is new feature that allows you to import images from your computer to the game for created wrestlers but I couldn’t access this feature at the time I was reviewing this game due to the servers not being open yet. Also, returning from WWF No Mercy a very long time ago, every superstar and diva in this game is editable. You can change their entire look but you cannot change their hairstyles. The biggest blunder is that you can only create 25 superstars.

This is the point where it gets very disappointing. Players can no longer create divas, arenas, championships, finishers, use custom soundtracks (although an update to next gen consoles will fix this soon), and the only preset custom entrance for custom superstars is the one where the superstar is carrying the phone.

There are also many and I mean MANY matches removed on the current gen consoles

1 vs 1:

– Inferno
– Ladder
– I Quit
– 2 out of 3 Falls
– Special Referee (yet is in the showcase mode)
– Casket (yet is in the Showcase mode)
– 3 stages of hell (Yet is in the showcase mode)
– Backstage Brawl

2 vs 2:

– Tornado Tag
– Extreme Rules
– Hell in a Cell
– Ladder
– Steel Cage
– Table
– TLC
– Elimination Tornado
– Elimination Table
– Mixed
– Backstage Brawl

Triple Threat:

– Falls Count Anywhere
– 2 out of 3 Falls
– No DQ
– Ladder
– Steel Cage
– TLC
– Backstage Brawl

Fatal 4 Way/4-Man:

– Battle Royal
– Hell in a Cell
– Ladder
– Steel Cage
– Table
– TLC
– Falls Count Anywhere
– 2 out of 3 Falls
– No DQ
– Backstage Brawl

6-Man:
– Elimination Chamber Tag
– Championship Scramble (Was removed in 2k14, but notable still)

Handicap Matches:
– All handicap matches

Final thoughts: if you want this game, the only good things are the MyCareer mode and the new gameplay features. You cannot hype a game this much for 6 months and then give us a half-assed game with missing features. 2K showcase is just a copy and paste of 30 years of WrestleMania from last year’s game and the Attitude era mode from WWE 13. I cannot find a reason why to spend $60 plus tax on a game that presents only half of what last year’s game had. If they kept all of those features in, this would have beat out last year’s game. I know this year’s game engine is built from ground up but that is no excuse to remove many features especially for the ones in the create suite community. The decision to take away the ability of creating divas is a slap in the face to every women who plays WWE games. Although you can create divas on the last gen version, that is not the point. My conclusion is that everyone should wait for next year’s game instead or keep 2K14 until next year. This game gets a final rating of 5.5/10

Video game reviews: Super Smash Bros. For 3DS

Finally, after 6 long years, A new Smash Bros game is here (for the Nintendo 3DS of course). Does this game live up to the hype? Well let’s see as I review Super Smash Bros. for 3DS.

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With 49 characters to choose from, this game has the largest roster to date. With newcomers such as Megaman, Pac-Man, Roslina, Dark Pit, Duckhunt, Bowser JR. And more along with returning characters featuring Mario, fox, Pikachu, Samus and Link and more, this gives you a variety of characters to choose from with many fighting styles they possess.

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First, I would like to talk about the graphics and presentation. Although it is highly recommended to play this on the 3DS XL, I have it for the normal 3DS and the only difference is that you can see what is going on more better when you play and everything else is slightly bigger than the normal 3DS. The graphics are actually great and it looks better in 3D. Super Smash Bros. Brawl had the realistic approach but this game’s approach is colorful and a bit cartoonish but that is not a bad thing at all as I think this game looks better than Brawl. The game also runs at 60 FPS (frames per second) and the speed of this game is much faster than Brawl but not as fast as Melee.

The gameplay on the handheld feels as if you are playing on a normal console but everyone’s perspective will be different or the same as mines depending on how they play. The commands are responsive but however, the functions for the circle control pad can take work but try to not overuse it or else it will break. A few gameplay changes from Brawl include removing the “random tripping” mechanic. Many players were turned away when that was included in Brawl so good thing that was taken out. The grabbing of ledges has been changed to prevent edge hogging. What this means is for example, If player 1 Is hanging on the edge for their life before they are knocked off, player 2 would try to hang on the edge but the player cannot because player 1 is already there and would stay there. This has been fixed so when this happens, the players would be bounced off in favor for the other player. The swimming feature from Brawl is also removed and the neutral attacks that previously ended in an indefinite number of weak hits will now always transition into a finishing move. I always had a problem with players spamming neutral attacks like that since Super Smash Bros. Melee so I was glad that was fixed.

One thing I almost forgot to mention is that larger characters such as Bowser, King Dededee, Donkey Kong and more actually look their size compared to past games.

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There are 34 stages in the game in their normal form and their final destination form. A few of the stages feature a boss character that you would have to defeat or a character that can assist you. My only problem with the stages is that they brought back too much stages from both Melee and Brawl. Two stages to be brought back would have been find but 9 is way too much.

Now there are a lot of modes in this game to keep you busy for a long time. Those are, Classic Mode, a mode Smash Bros. Veterans know but it changed a bit. Now you can choose your path on which opponent you would like to face and there is a slot reel for rewards for you to choose before a match begins. Other modes include All Star Mode, Multi-Man Smash, Target Blast, Trophy Rust and the Home Run Contest. All of these modes you can win trophies, coins and custom parts in which I will get to. The most disappointing mode of the entire game is the Smash Run. You spend 5 minutes on this mode with 3 other players or CPU collecting power ups on the map by defeating enemies and when the time runs out, the final battle begins in either a match or an event to race to the finish. How would you like to collect power ups for strength and defense to then realize that the finial event (if it is an race to the finish), one player is very faster than everyone else and that is unfair. If the final battle is a match, you will not know if it is a team match or a different rule until it happens.

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The customization is new to the series. You can create up to 8 characters using the Mii and their styles you can choose from are gunner, brawler and sword fighter. They all can be customized by appearance and move set and stats. All of the normal characters can be customized too by changing their stats and their special moves. This is great and you can create many possibilities with this. Unlocking the moves and stay power ups take time but it is totally worth it.

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My final take on this game is that it is great for everyone to play. Although the smash run is an upset, it is still good for casual playing other than just VS. Matches. The soundtrack to this game was great too and this game fixed a lot of the issues that was in Brawl. The Wii-U version comes out later this year but this is totally worth spending your money on and at least everyone gets their own screen.

Gameplay – 4.5/5

Music- 5/5

Replay value- 5/5

Presentation and graphics- 4.5/5

Final score – 9.5/10

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Video game reviews: Destiny

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What a disappointment. Destiny isn’t a bad game, per say, but it doesn’t come anywhere close to living up to its original promise. At its core, Destiny is what Bungie likes to call a “shared world shooter.” It has the controls and mechanics of a first person shooter, the progression system and sandbox open worlds of a role playing game, and the online connectivity of an MMO. To set Destiny apart from the competition, Bungie promised that it would feature a sprawling, dynamic, and ever-evolving galaxy with a rich story that could make the game last as long as a decade. What I got instead was a largely formulaic game that I don’t foresee playing for more than a week or two.

One of Destiny’s biggest missteps is its story missions, which I expected to be the highlight of the game considering Bungie’s track record with the Halo series. Despite its rich lore, the story itself is extremely lackluster; unfinished even. By the end of the main campaign, I found myself just as confused about vague entities like The Darkness and The Traveler as I was when I first booted up the game, and I never quite got the sensation that a chapter of a long running series had come to a close. Instead, it felt more like someone had torn off the second half of an already incomprehensible and boring book. Like a season of Lost, Destiny answers few of the questions surrounding its world’s mystery, but at least Lost presented its story in a compelling way. Rather than taking advantage of the interactive medium that is video games to draw players into the world to make them feel like they are experiencing events unfold, the game takes to exposition through Peter Dinklage’s boring narrations as the Ghost (the player’s miniature levitating artificial intelligence robot companion) to tell its story. Playing through Destiny’s main campaign was essentially like playing through a sophisticated audio book – one with little to no character or plot development.

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Even more monotonous than Destiny’s story was the mission structure, which remains exactly the same for every mission from beginning to end. Missions essentially bog down to going from point A to point B, deploying the Ghost to scan or hack an alien technology, and then either going from point B to point C and deploying the Ghost again, or, usually in the final stages of a mission, fighting off a horde of enemies while the Ghost hacks into whatever system it was deployed to. That’s about it. It was fun the first few times, but this repetitive mission structure became stagnant and stale very quickly, especially throughout the course of a dozen or two hours. The only reason I stuck with the main campaign was because it was one of the best ways to level up my Guardian, but it felt like a tedious chore for the most part. Without a doubt, Destiny’s main campaign is the worst aspect of the game.

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To navigate from mission to mission, players must make use of the game’s beautifully presented galactic map, which shows accessible planets in the Solar System. Planets and missions are unlocked as players complete story missions, which further incentivizes players to complete Destiny’s boring main campaign . When a planet is selected from the galactic map, it zooms in to show a map of its sandbox game world with various map markers, each of which represent a mission. It’s only after selecting one of these markers that players will be taken to their selected planet to tackle their selected mission. Most of them are story missions, but each planet features at least one Patrol mission (which allow players to free roam a planet’s sandbox world and complete small and often tedious and boring objectives) and one Strike mission (instanced dungeons tackled with a strike team), and some planets feature high level events called Raids.

While these sandbox worlds are large in volume, I would be more thrilled if they weren’t so barren. Filling Destiny’s worlds with interactive NPCs who could tell players more about the lore and the situation of a particular planet or offer players side quests would have gone a long way into making the worlds of Destiny more compelling. These worlds do spawn enemy creatures throughout the map once in a while, but unfortunately, the enemy variety in Destiny is abysmal. Each enemy race (Fallen, Hive, Vex, and Cabal) only features a handful of creature types whose color palettes change every once in a while to indicate that they are a higher level than the ones from before. While the game does space out the introduction of each enemy race evenly, there is a long stretch of time between each introduction, and during that time, I found myself facing the same handful of enemy types over and over again. Once I did encounter a new race, it wouldn’t take long before the game showed off all the creature types of that race, and the cycle would repeat.

Despite its incomprehensible and uninteresting story, formulaic mission structure, barren game worlds, and lackluster enemy variety, the game does make some great strides when it comes to core gameplay mechanics. As you would expect from a Bungie game, gunplay is fast-paced, smooth, and satisfying. The game does only run at 30 frames per second, which may disappoint competitive players, but in my experience, that did little to detract from accurate and precise shooting. The gunplay feels even more thrilling when combined with the game’s high level of challenge. The game is not a cakewalk by any means. While it is mostly a run and gun game, players who don’t take the occasional cover or choose a strategic position from which to take out their enemies will find themselves hitting the sack often, especially because of how smart, relentless, and visceral the enemy AI is. Despite the game’s repetitive mission structure, the challenge it offers does make it satisfying to overcome each mission.

Where Destiny shines even brighter is its RPG elements. Character progression in particular is very well executed and quite addictive, making the chore of playing through story missions to level up or to obtain new items and equipment almost worthwhile. The game begins with players choosing one of three classes (Titan, Warlock, or Hunter) and customizing their race, gender, and appearance. Only the player’s class will have any major impact on gameplay; the rest are simply aesthetic choices. I was expecting character customization to be more extensive than choosing from a bunch of presets, but there are enough options to allow players to create relatively unique characters.

With each level, players will earn new skills that are unique to their subclass. Each one of the game’s three classes features two subclasses: one which is readily available from the beginning and another that unlocks at level 15. Since each subclass can equip any kind of weapon, choosing a subclass is less about filling the shoes of a pre-defined role and more about finding something that matches your playstyle. The Titan’s Striker subclass is suited players who like to run-and-gun and get up close and personal, while the Defender subclass is suited for players who like to play defensively. The Warlock’s Voidwalker subclass is suited for players who like high offense and crowd control at the sacrifice of defense, while the Sunsinger subclass are like clerics in MMORPGs: geared more towards those who prefer a support-based playstyle. Finally, the Hunter’s Gunslinger subclass are for marksmen who are all about precision shooting, while the Bladedancer subclass are for those who like to use stealth and close quarters combat to outdo their enemies. But at the end of the day, players can take advantage of each subclass’s skills any way they please, use them with any combination of weapons, and develop a style of their own. The best part is that players can switch between active skills and on the fly to mix and match ones that better suit their playstyle for certain situations. The game even allows players to switch between subclasses on the fly, which is almost unheard of. Destiny truly does offer one of the most flexible character progression systems out there.

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Leveling also influences what weapons and armors players can equip, since equipment in Destiny are only capped by the player’s level. Destiny does not feature any attributes which players can add points to after leveling like in other RPGs or MMORPGs. Instead, most of a Guardian’s power and stats are directly influenced by their equipment’s stats, so it’s vital that players obtain up-to-level equipment as soon as they can. Since equipment has such a large influence in Destiny’s character progression, finding new ones always feels like Christmas, especially since most of them look pretty cool, especially towards the higher levels. The satisfaction that comes from equipping Guardians with new gear and watching and feeling them grow more powerful, paired with the game’s flexible character progression, was one of the main reasons I kept coming back to Destiny despite its repetitive nature.

Destiny soft caps players to level 20, but players can go beyond that by equipping rare equipment that come with a stat called Light. The higher the amount of Light in a piece of gear, the more powerful it is, and the total amount of combined Light will define how many levels above 20 a Guardian is. Some equipment with Light can be found by playing missions in high difficulty after reaching level 20, but the most powerful weapons and armor can only be purchased through one of various vendors in The Tower (the game’s social and non-hostile hub). These vendors only accept one of the game’s various currencies.

Glimmer is what players will be using initially to purchase items, weapons, and armors, but eventually, they will begin to earn Vanguard Marks, Crucible Marks, Motes of Light, and Strange Coins. Vangaurd Marks can most effectively be earned by playing Strike missions in the Vanguard hub or by completing Vanguard bounties, Crucible Marks can only be earned by playing competitive multiplayer matches in the Crucible hub, Motes of Light can most effectively be earned by leveling up after reaching the level 20 soft cap, and Strange Coins can most effectively be earned by completing weekly heroic Strike missions. Earning these different currencies is an extremely slow process that involves repeating certain tasks over and over again. It’s tedious and it definitely feels like grinding, but those who can bear with it will be greatly rewarded. I do wish that the game would simply have one universal currency though. By the time I reached level 20, I felt as though I had wasted my time collecting and saving up Glimmer, as they cannot be used for anything substantial towards the end game. At least giving players the ability to convert Glimmer into other currencies, even if at a high cost, would have made a big difference.

It’s not all about cooperation though. Another way the game brings players together is through Crucible, Destiny’s competitive multiplayer hub. Crucible features four game modes: Control, Clash, Rumble, and Skirmish. There are other game modes that will become temporarily available in the coming days and months through special events, but I’ll be reviewing the game as it ships. Control is your typical point-control style game mode, Clash is essentially team deathmatch, Rumble is free-for-all deathmatch, and Skirmish is similar to team deathmatch, but it reduces team sizes from 6 to 3 while allowing players to revive fallen comrades, encouraging them to stick together. Destiny doesn’t do anything revolutionary with competitive multiplayer, but I still found it to be a lot of fun. The Guardians’ powers in particular separate Destiny’s competitive multiplayer from the competition, as they bring about an interesting new dynamic to what could have otherwise been a sterotypical multiplayer mode. The ability to use earned gear to annihilate other players is an added bonus.

The biggest praise I can give to Destiny is that it’s presentation is immaculate. Despite its lackluster story and narrative, the lore has been richly realized through incredible artistic direction and visuals. I was skeptical at first about Bungie’s intentions to mix the aesthetics of fantasy with sci-fi, but it paid off big time. The lore looks and feels like a fantasy story taking place in the future. Even more mesmerizing than the game’s visuals is its soundtrack. Destiny features some of the best orchestrated music I have listened to in a video game in a long time, and they kick in just at the right time during gameplay to provide the appropriate mood and atmosphere for certain situations. It’s easy to tell that everything about Destiny’s lore, aesthetics, and presentation has been crafted with love and care.

Despite Destiny’s beautiful presentation and polished core mechanics, its lackluster story, uninteresting worlds, and repetitive mission structure keep it from becoming legend. The game is by no means a disaster. The satisfying gunplay, the challenging missions, and addictive character progression will keep players hooked for a decent amount of time. But in its current state, there is no way this game can stay alive for 10 long years. I don’t think Bungie comprehends just how long that is, especially if they expect players to repeat the same mission structure over and over again while experiencing a story that is as incoherent as it is uninteresting. It’s hard to say what the future holds for Destiny, since the game will constantly evolve as new content is added throughout its lifespan, but as it stands, Destiny is a good game that could have been so much more.

My final rating for this game is a 7.5/10

Follow me @julianexcalibur

retro video game review: metal gear solid portable ops

Julian Cannon sneaking back on here for another video game review. This time it is Metal Gear Solid portable ops. Also follow me on twitter @julianexcalibur

Metal Gear Solid portable ops is a stealth action game released for the PlayStation portable in December 2006 in Japan and in January 2007 world wide. This was the first game to not have a numbered title since the first Metal Gear (MSX version) and many thought it was a spinoff until hideo kojima confirmed that it was Canon a few months earlier. This game is the sequel to metal gear solid 3(set in 1964) and the prequel to metal gear solid peace walker(set in 1974). In this game you are playing as big boss (naked snake) and many other characters are playable as well. Now let’s get to the review

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Story

In 1970, 6 years after the operation snake eater, the FOX unit has been disbanded by the CIA with their takeover of the group. Snake is seen in prison being interrogated by LT Cunningham about the location of the first half of the philosophers legacy that was obtained at the end of mgs3. Once the torture is finished, snake meets a young Roy Campbell for the first time and plans an escape. When they do escape, snake gets in contact with para medic and she tells him that he and major zero have been arrested for treason against the government. Snake then vows to end the former FOX unit by forming FOXHOUND with Roy Campbell.  With this new unit,they have recruited soldiers from south America as well as encountering the old ones from FOX. Some time later,snake finds Frank Jaeger (Gray Fox) and the two of them battle in a fist vs sword match. After the fight,Frank joins big boss rebellion and a character named gene was revealed to be the new leader of FOX.

To complicate matters, Gene has also convinced most of the Russian soldiers stationed at the base to join their side by simply taking over the chain of command belonging to a former Red Army unit, which was secretly stationed inside the Colombian territory. In order to complete his mission, Snake must persuade enemy soldiers to join his ranks due to the scale of his mission.


Snake and his squad defeat the top members of the FOX unit and eventually they make their way into Gene’s guesthouse. Snake learns many things on his way. Cunningham was working for the Pentagon and wanted Snake to push Gene into launching a nuke at Russia to tarnish the CIA’s reputation and to prolong the Cold War. Gene was actually aware of this plan from the beginning due to information from Ocelot. Gene really wanted to launch a nuke at America to destroy the Philosophers and to make his nation of soldiers, “Army’s Heaven”. Snake destroys an experimental model of the ICBMG (the Metal Gear model) codenamed RAXA and eventually defeats Gene, destroying the finished ICBMG model afterward. After Gene is defeated he gives Snake the funds, equipment, personnel, and all other information regarding “Army’s Heaven”. On his return home, Snake is awarded for his actions, he then establishes FOXHOUND worldwide  afterwards. Elsewhere, Ocelot kills the DCI (Director of Central Intelligence) and takes documents containing the identities of the Philosophers in an effort to “end them”.

In the post-credits epilogue, Ocelot speaks with major zero  on the phone, they are plotting to use the Legacy to fulfill their own agenda. Ocelot actually wanted the trajectory data of the nuke to point to the DCI, in order to black mail the DCI into giving Ocelot the documents containing the true identities of the Philosophers. Ocelot agrees to join his new employer’s project under the condition that Snake/Big Boss participates as well .this leads to the creation of the patriots

Gameplay

The item menu has completely changed in this game,as we are used to the box scrolling style,it is displayed like your right side of your PSP face buttons. You can also recruit soldiers in the game as well for you to rank up. Also this is the first metal gear game that you can change the campaign main character to another from your unit. You will play as snake in the beginning but along the way,you can play as Roy Campbell, major zero,python, gray fox ,para-medic and one of your soldiers.  Every character has their own abilities and have their own set of weapons.  Also if you are near death you can call for an assist from one of your teammates. The cqc feature from the previous game has been fixed since the last game you had to use about 4 buttons at a time. Portable ops also had metal gear online 1, which was released with metal gear solid 3 thrre years before.  The servers ran from January 2007-September 2012. Here you can play multiplayer against players around the world in free for all,team deathmatch,capture mission, cqc only, and more matchtypes. Other than your soldiers, you can also use Big Boss, Zero, Gray Fox,Roy Campbell, Python, Viper. And KGB soldiers . Downloadable Content included Old Snake (Solid Snake) ,Raiden, Ocelot, Meryl, and 6 maps.

Music

Portable Ops also comes with a complete score done by Norihiko Hibino, Takahiro Izutani, Yoshitaka Suzuki, Kazuma Hinnouchi, Nobuko Toda and Akihiro Honda while Kazuma Hinnouchi, Nobuko Toda and Akihiro Honda who composed the ending theme- “Calling to the Night” but was arranged by Norihiko Hibino. The ending theme’s vocals are provided by Natasha Farrow, and lyrics by Nobuko Toda. Harry Gregson-Williams was unable to help compose the game’s music due to schedule conflicts with Tony Scott’s film Deja Vu and Kojima’s Metal Gear Solid 4

Final thoughts

I have enjoyed this game since I got my hands on it in 2007 and I wish they never shut down the servers for this game. The controls are smooth and responsive for a psp game. The boss battles were quite intense including the one with Gray Fox and Gene. I would recommend anybody who follows the storyline to get this game since it is the sequel to metal gear solid 3 :snake eater. if you just want to simply read it, look up the name of the story of this game “San Hieronymo Takeover”

I give this game a final rating of 9.5/10

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kccppYUFc-4

retro video game review : Zelda II:the adventure of Link

Zelda II- THE ADVENTURE IF LINK REVIEW

Julian cannon back again for a Retro video game review ..this time it is back to the NES era. Zelda II THE ADVENTURE OF LINK.

According to the Zelda timeline released in late 2011.. this game followes the first branch (there are 3 branches) after ocarina of time and it is the final game in the first branch and the sequel to the original legend of Zelda for the NES.. the first timeline is what could happen if link does not defeat ganon in the final battle of ocarina of time.

The first thing you’ll realize when you start an actual game is that your main character, Link, can’t move up or down as he can in the prequel — instead he’s been blessed with the action-game duet of Crouching and Jumping. If you’d played the original Zelda first, you might be wondering, What’s going on here? Then you’d read the instruction booklet… and still wonder, what’s going on here? That’s right kiddies. Zelda II has shifted gameplay focus from the previous overhead view style to a more common side-scrolling style. There’s still the old overhead view, but there is little to no action involved during this view — instead, it acts as your map-traversing view, which I’ll elaborate on later. But for all of your battle needs, you’ll be spending time in the side-scrolling world. While some may be disappointed in the sudden shift of gameplay, I found it to be an added challenge, and got a kick out of it. In the original Zelda, Link could “throw his sword” the entire length of the screen when his life was at full. This time around, however, the sword blast (a) has shrunk to a puny size and (b) travels a much shorter distance, dissipating within two or three of Link’s body lengths horizontally. In addition to the shortened range, you must now learn to be adept with Link’s shield. The shift from overhead to sidescrolling action has left Link’s legs vulnerable to crouching attacks, and you must crouch to prevent Link from having his knees cut up. Of course, crouching leaves his head open, so you can imagine what would happen when you get into an intense sword fight. But that’s part of the fun in Zelda II — the immense tension that builds up when battling dreaded IronKnuckles with shields, capable of fighting at your skill level, hitting high and low in random patterns. While stabbing in the air, trying to hit your mark and get past its shield, you also must keep the warrior from penetrating your defenses, and you end up playing a hectic game of Stand-Crouch-n-Stab. The intensity level of Zelda II’s battles is the source of this game’s addictive fun factor.

However, missing from Zelda II is the vast usable inventory that Link carried in the prequel. In its stead are automatically used items, magic spells and fighting techniques for Link to search and find during his travels. Items such as the Candle and the Power Glove make their returns, but are used in different fashions. The Candle automatically lights up a dimmed area, for example, and obtaining the Power Glove turns Link’s attacks into block-crushing blows. The interesting spells and techniques, however, make the sacrifice of the large usable inventory perhaps justifiable. In addition to stabbing and poking left and right, Link eventually gains the ability to jump and stab both downwards and upwards ( a move that was eventually carried over to the super smash bros. Series)

The graphics are decent, less colorful than the original Zelda but more detailed and larger in general. Link and his enemies now stand taller, at more realistic proportions, as opposed to the old squishy deformed status of old. Enemies sport certain color schemes, indicating their strength, much like the original Zelda. The palaces also have different color schemes, and tend to appear a bit on the monocrhomatic side. However, you’ll see different columns, bricks (for the walls), headpieces portruding from walls, and statues of ironknuckles scattered about. Enemies stand out from backgrounds well enough for you to battle effectively (at least, enemies that aren’t meant to be camoflauged). The overhead map shows very simplistic yet clear definitions of mountains, plains, forests, desert, and roads.

As a result of the high difficulty, the game can take up to 14 hours to beat. Consider: you have seven palaces to conquer. Four life containers to find. Four Magic containers to find. 8 levels to build, in each stat. Tasks to complete, techniques and spells to learn. Unless you’re really good, you’ll find yourself spending somewhere around half an hour to an hour on each palace, an hour or so on Death Mountain, a couple of hours level building, etc. Either that, or this game reviewer is pretty bad with his ninja-gaming skills. It’s a tough game, and if you love a challenge, dust off that NES and get to work on this cartridge

Also new to this game is the debut of dark/shadow link. He is not that hard as he was in ocarina of time,but the battle is worth it considering that he is the final boss of this game

n the end, the completely different system of Zelda II’s gameplay didn’t bother me. I found it a refreshing change and a challenging experience. I did not know that this game existed until the Zelda collection came out in 2003 for the Nintendo gamecube. The ability to jump and defend with more precision is welcome, and all the while the game manages to retain the heavy adventure aspect that we’ve come to expect from any Zelda game released. Zelda II: The Adventures of Link, is a sometimes frustrating but overall very fun experience.

Gameplay :7

Graphics: 7.5

Difficulty : 9

Sound : 8

Replay value :8

Final score : 8.5/10

retro video game review: Metal Gear (MSX2 version)

Julian cannon back with another retro video game review. this time it is the very first metal gear for the msx2, although I did not play this until the hd collection.

in the metal gear timeline, this takes place after the upcoming metal gear solid: ground zeros and before metal gear 2 solid snake

Most gamers were introduced to Metal Gear Solid on the Playstation back in 1998. In addition to stealth gameplay that was unrivaled at the time, Metal Gear Solid also incorporated brilliant voice acting, off-beat humor, political satire and lengthy cut-scenes that drove a semi-truck worth of backstory and character development. Many of these cut-scenes, however, mentioned incidents and characters that were not included in Metal Gear Solid, leaving some gamers confused if this was an original game concept or a sequel to something nobody had heard of.

The answer is yes. To both.

The original Metal Gear was originally released for the MSX2 home computer in Japan, then later ported (albeit terribly) to the NES here in America. Metal Gear served as the game that would later set the stage for future Metal Gear Solid titles with what unfolded. Now keep in mind, Metal Gear for the MSX2 and for the NES are almost two different experiences, so I will do my best to differentiate between the two. The story line is nearly identical in both versions with some minor differences, but the main changes are in how the game plays and the overall layout of the game.

The plot is this game takes place in 1995 (in the timeline the name of the storyline is the outer heaven uprising). You are Solid Snake, a military operative working for FOXHOUND sent into a mercenary base in order to infiltrate and destroy Metal Gear, a nuclear tank that can walk. later in the game, you will find out that big boss is working as a double agent, revealing to snake that he is the commander of both outer heaven and FOXHOUND. When playing the MSX2 version, you start at the unmanned front door of the mercenary base, getting occasional messages from Big Boss (your leader) about current objectives. On the NES, you start in the middle of nowhere and must traverse through oddly placed guard dogs, mazes that make no sense and terrible ‘engrish.’

On the MSX2, you start at the front door of Outer Heaven.

The controls are responsive and actually fairly tight for its time. What confused me were the action buttons. On the NES, the B-button will punch enemies, and the A-button will use whatever weapon you have equipped (or do nothing if not equipped). The response time feels a little more reactive on the NES than the MSX2 version, but that might be the only positive aspect of the NES version. The NES port really gets plagued by level design and layout, which makes the game more frustrating and difficult than it needs to be. There are many situations where there is just enough of a gap in between a car and a bush that makes you think you can traverse through it, but you end up hitting an invisible wall and rethinking your strategy.

There are some poor logistics that exist in both versions of Metal Gear that can work in your favor and against you at the same time. Metal Gear is one of those games that reset the contents of a room once you leave it, the only exception being key items. This works great if you find an empty location that has rations (in-game health) or ammo that will infinitely respawn every time you re-enter a room, but the same tactic also applies to enemies. To make matters worse, in some rooms the enemies start their walking path right in front of the door you just exited, meaning you will enter the alert phase where waves of enemies come pouring into your screen in order to eliminate you.

On the NES, you start with this guy and his poor english. Also notice the more ‘cartoony’ color scheme.

Both games have their share of random occurrences that will either make you scratch your head in confusion or make you question what you just saw (much like everything in Metal Gear Solid 2). Starting with the NES, there are a few instances where the floor you are walking on just vanishes, killing you instantly. There is no warning, rhyme or reason for it. At first glance it looks like a logical path then the floor just goes away. In both games, there is a gas chamber that you need to progress through, but the only warning you get is once you actually have entered the room and are beginning to lose life. Big Boss actually calls you to tell you, “I nearly forgot, you need a gas mask to get through the gas chamber.”

Yeah, thanks a lot, buddy.

The inventory can be a problem in certain situations. You are allowed to carry one weapon and one accessory active at a time, so lets say you have a handgun and a card-key active. Using the gas mask example I just mentioned, you have to use the card-key to open the door leading to the gas chamber, meaning you don’t have the gas mask active, losing health in the process. You then switch to the gas mask (as unnecessarily reminded by Big Boss) and make your way through the room to the other door only to find out you need to switch out your gas mask for your card-key in order to escape the room of impending death. To summarize, you lose either way, friend-o.

Speaking of card-keys, there are nearly a dozen different cards that you need, with no distinct way to distinguish between them all. You constantly will be going through all your card-keys trying to figure out which one you need to open the door and escape the small militia shooting at you. I did some research on this, and actually found out that series creator Hideo Kojima wanted to create a sense of anxiety and panic when trying to open a door. Makes sense, but when you have a dozen different card-keys and every door looks exactly the same it’s hard to make sense of it.

Here’s my final gripe with the NES version, and I apologize now but this might be a spoiler to some, despite the fact this game has been out for a long time. The title of the game is Metal Gear, the bipedal nuclear tank you are trying to destroy. In the MSX2 version, you finally face-off against Metal Gear, then have the final confrontation against Big Boss (this shouldn’t come as a surprise to anybody). In the NES version, you fight a super computer that controls Metal Gear and its movements, then the confrontation against Big Boss. A game titled Metal Gear that doesn’t physically include Metal Gear is like a Legend of Zelda game without Zelda or an Uncharted game without Nathan Drake. For me, this was a huge let down.

One of the final bosses, Metal Gear isn’t as big of a threat as advertised, but it still freaked me out when I got this far.

I should keep in mind as sort of geek humor; the super computer in the NES version is constantly showing a blue screen. I never guessed mercenaries were using Windows 2.0 back in the day to control Metal Gear.

Even more frightening than the nuclear bipedal tank Metal gear is the blue screen of death.

Metal Gear is, despite the problems and plagues, a fun experience and worth playing. I highly recommend avoiding the NES version and going for the MSX2 adaption. The MSX2 version is included in the Metal Gear Solid HD Collection, as part of Metal Gear Solid 3. One thing I failed to mention earlier was that the NES port was not overseen by Hideo Kojima but rather a different team from within Konami, thus the varying differences. Kojima has stated that he does not like the NES version and finds it “too difficult for all the wrong reasons.” I highly recommend, if you’re a Metal Gear (Solid) fan, go buy the Metal Gear Solid HD Collection and check out the original Metal Gear and its sequel, Metal Gear 2 Solid Snake.

Retro Review: 4/5

12 days of christmas: hardest items to find in the Final Fantasy series

hello everybody, Julian cannon has returned for a new post. I am sorry that I have not been posting, I was busy with Christmas shopping and family and etc, but anyways, Christmas is here and I love it because you have your gift there and you wonder what it is. on this case, you would want to know where it is, here is my new top 10 and it is the 10 hardest items to find in the final fantasy series

10. final fantasy X-world champion

I played final fantasy 10 at least 5 times and I never wanted to do the blitz ball minigame because I hated it. but then I did it again just to get waka waka’s ultimate weapon, the world champion..without it, you will not be able to use him properly, especially during the 3rd battle against Seymour. to get this item, you literally have to play that minigame and win about 10-15 times without loosing at all. this can take a full day or week depending on how often you play. if you have the time, do something I should have done the first time and do it

9.final fantasy X- venus sigil

another one from this game but this one is extremely hard. for the venus sigil(lulu’s ultimate weapon) you will have to go to the thunder plains and doge 200 lightning bolts WITHOUT getting hit. once you get hit, it starts over and you are stuck doing it again after 199 times. that is a killer is it. I was so mad everytime I got close and I never wanted to do it again.The best way is to stay at the south part of the Thunder Plains and dodge the lightning bolts at where there is a white path near at the right side. Reach to the white path, and stand still until the lightning bolt comes down, this way is alot more faster then any other way of dodging lightning bolts. I managed to dodge the lightning bolts 200 times in about 35 minutes.

8.final fantasy  XII-2- clock master skill

this skill, or in this case item, is the most useful ability in the game period. Final fantasy XII-2 was released in January 2012 and it has got positive feedback. but I have never got this until I saw a youtube video. and that is the clock master skill. to do this you have to collect all 160 fragments in the game. that is very tough because that is very impossible without the dlc features. also some of them you will have to find the 7 paradox endings in the game after you beat the main story. what does this skill do? it speeds the ENTIRE game, including cutscenes so that is very usefiul for traveling to do more stuff and to finish battles very quick, even at the hard setting. Try to get this if you can because it will take over 100 hours to do so

7. final fantasy VIII- triple triad cards

it can be debated that the card game in final fantasy VIII is the most annoying part of the game. when you first play the minigame, you get worthless cards(umm remember the yu-gi-oh games too) but you will get stronger ones on the way. That is the keyword, “on the way”. the rules are basic but on the way, the rules change too often that you cannot get the cards. for example, the “elemental”,”plus” and “combo” rule makes you want to turn of your playstation because u will loose your strongest card. now when you win, you can get to choose what card you want to win, however, there will be new winning situations, such as whatever card you take you win. that can be the easiest and hardest task of the minigame. now the cards are used to turn into items, you can easily get everybody’s strongest weapons from these but if you keep loosing cards, then you also will loose the parts of the weapon.

6. Final fantasy V- ragnarok sword

final fantasy 5 to me is the hardest game in the series and the most broken also. I loved the job system and the very hard bosses but this stands out for all of them. somewhere in the last dungeon, there will be a treasure chest, you will not know what it is until it shows “monster in a box”. that monster is no other than shinryu. you will think of nothing until his first or second attack which is tidal wave, which will do about 7000-8500 damage to your party. you can go back there many times but he will still be there until you beat him. when you do, you will get the strongest sword in the game, which is the ragnarok. that sword doubles the damage done to an enemy, and if you have that equipped while you have the “rapid fire-spellblade-one handed” abilities, not only its the most deadly combo in the game, but you will attack for a total of 8 attacks.

5. Final fantasy XII- zodiac spear

final fantasy XII is on my top 3 of the final fantasy series. the battle system is arguably the best in the entire system, and the environments were well done. the story is pretty much law and order mix with star wars. but the only downside to XII is getting the weapons. the zodiac spear is the strongest weapon in the game and all characters can equip the spear. it also gives the user 150+ attack, 20% chance of attacking more than once, and evasion 40%. but to get this spear, you would have realized it when you were looking it up online to find out that you cannot open all the treasure chests in the game. that left so many players confused into why square enix would do that. I will not post on what chests that cannot be open because it is a long chart. but after you find out which ones it is,  the Zodiac Spear will appear in the Necrohol of Nabus.

4. final fantasy IX- Excalibur 2

Excalibur II is one of the hardest weapons to obtain in the entire Final Fantasy series, as it cannot be bought from a shop or dropped or stolen from any monster. The only way the player can obtain the Excalibur II is to make it to the game’s final dungeon, Memoria, into the room Gate to Space (where the party fights Lich) without exceeding 12 hours of playtime. Once Lich is defeated, the player must search the pillar on the right of the room to receive the sword.Passing three discs in 12 hours is a challenge, but if one is going after a “perfect” game save, there is much more that needs to be considered, such as many items, key items, and such cannot be obtained after their respective disc. This is made harder by the fact that to get one key item later on, one will need to have not missed any treasure. Another issue is achieving “perfect stats”; if one is to make the most of a character’s stat potential one must play a “level 1 game” until disc 4, when the best stat-boosting equipment becomes available. However, there are four battles in which EXP must be gained: the three battles fought in Pandemonium, and Tantarian. So players have to choose what players absorb what EXP. So “perfect stats” and the issues mentioned above make the challenge probably the hardest challenge available in Final Fantasy. For years, this challenge was thought impossible on the PAL version of the game due to the 50/60Hz conflict, but recent runs have shown that a PAL play-through is possible, but extremely difficult. Similarly, the challenge is possible in the PS-one “classics” downloaded version of the game but difficult due to the inability to skip FMVs (which adds about 2 hours to game time).

3. final fantasy XII-omega weapon

final fantasy XII is a game known in the series for being way too linear. but the after game missions kept me interested. but the one thing didn’t was getting the omega weapon. this is lightning’s strongest gunblade in the game. to get it, you would have to upgrade all of your weapons until the ultima weapon stage, then you would have to find  51x Chobham Armor, 45x Electrode, 28x Crystal Oscillator, 6x Particle Accelerator, 2x Trapezohedron. all in which will take hours and hours of battles or 5 star missions. you can buy these things but one item each is over 900,00 gil and you would have to transfer from different locations to get the rest of them for the same price. but anyways, this blade has a quick stagger ability, which means after the stagger bar goes up to 50%, it will auto stagger after that poiny, leaving you to do some pretty impressive damage every hit.

2. final fantasy VII-omnislash

this game is widely considered the most overrated video game of all time..and at some points I do agree. final fantasy VII is not on my favorite list but it is still a great game. but getting cloud’s level 4 and final limit break omnislash is a real pain in the ass. you would have to go to the battle square at that carnival and try to get 32000 points in total. that seems easy but you would have to go through stage fights( just like the 100 floors in paper Mario-the thousand year door) and it gets tough every time. if you do not want to get the move, then you will have to wait for the final battle( after safer sephiroth) to use the move. recently, the pc version that was re-released this year gave you an achievement for learning the move for 200 game points, that means you would have to go to the battle square to actually learn the move

1. final fantasy IV- pink tail

final fantasy IV was released in 1991, and since that release and remakes on various systems, I have never ever got the pink tail. and I bet nobody else got it either. to get this you will have to defeat a flan princess. seems ok at first but you will have to wait for the flan to drop the item. but it does not!!!. I have read that it has a 1/64 chance of dropping the item, which means it can take you hours or even months to get this item. which also meand that you will have to battle them in groups again and again until you get it which can be a real pain in the ass. while you are doing this, you will realize the pattern after every battle but the ratio starts over again for some reason. this issue was never fixed until the psp release of final fantasy IV-the complete collection. with this item, you will trade it to a blacksmith for adamant armor. not only that it is the strongest armor in the game, it can be equipped to any party member despite their character class. also the longer your character does not do an action, the more the defense will rise during battle