Prey Review

Arkane have, in just a short amount of time, mastered their craft. The Dishonored games did a great job at throwing a bunch of tools at the player and letting them navigate rich deep worlds the way they want to. Prey feels the same, only amplified. Trading in swords and spirits for guns and neurological enhancements, Prey could be construed as Arkane’s take on science fiction. It hits some pretty familiar beats throughout, but Prey feels like a natural evolution of the Arkane trademark formula.


Prey itself takes place in an alternate timeline where John F Kennedy survived the assassination attempt in 1963, in turn directing more funding into the space program and sending us into space much earlier. In Prey, you are Morgan Yu, an employee for Transtar who presently owns the research space station Talos-1. Morgan wakes up with little to no memory of his past, but discovers that he himself is intrinsically tied to the station and its bizarre alien research.

 Prey-Screen-CorpsePrey’s storyline sounds pretty cliché and at times it is, though the story isn’t afraid to head into stranger directions than you’d normally expect. As the game began I wasn’t too keen to progress in the story, instead exploring the space station at my own leisure. Though as I got further in, Prey threw some twists at me that hooked me on the ideas it was selling. Despite this, I still found the playable character somewhat unlikable and the main villain quite forgettable. Still, Prey’s story hits the right beats at the right time to pique players’ interests. Think of it as a warped combination: Memento meets Dead Space meets BioShock.

When you play the first hour or so of Prey, more seasoned gamers will see where the game draws inspiration. You’re on a space station, it’s falling apart, you start off with a wrench, you use powers to defend yourself called psionics and you’re being lead along by a faceless or mysterious voice. Prey is woven from strong genes – taking inspiration from Dead Space, Dishonored, System Shock and BioShock. It’s a first-person game that isn’t afraid to have moments of quiet time to let you explore the sprawling space station that is Talos-1 at your own pace and leisure.

That’s really the name of the game with Prey. It’s an open world, that lets you explore areas of the space station in (almost) whatever order you wish. Everything is connected, whether you want to naturally get to an area using the winding corridors of the space station or you want to leave the station and re-enter it elsewhere while floating in space. Prey’s densely packed world, shortcuts and connections all come together to give the game a sense of having an open world without the barren filler environments that commonly come with it.

When you’re navigating the world of Prey you’ll be outfitted with a variety of abilities, weapons and powers that let you approach the playground of Talos-1 the way you want to. Most weapons serve a dual purpose – they can also be used to create platform on the walls to circumvent obstacles, or activate buttons from a short distance away. Each weapon having multiple uses encourages experimentation, as well as thinking outside of the box.

When you’re done with Prey once, I’d be surprised if you didn’t want to jump into it again. Not only because you’ll probably miss something while trying to explore the sprawling Talos-1 station, but also because you can change the outcome of the game based on your treatment of others throughout the story. It’s nothing totally revolutionary, but given Prey’s flexible systems, running through a second time is bound to be different to your first, intentional or not.

Your play style will greatly decide how long it’ll take you to run through Prey, though I’d estimate most players would get at least fifteen to twenty hours out of their first run. Perhaps even more if they explored the station thoroughly. This much is certain: Prey is a game that just begs to be played at least once more once you’ve finished it.

Taking a page out of Dishonored’s book, Prey features a stylised art style to bring its world to life. The result is something that never looks hyper-realistic but something more distinctive instead. Artistically speaking, Prey brings together retro designs with futuristic ones to create something not unlike BioShock’s Art Deco style. From a technical standpoint, the game is running on CryEngine which brings with it the usual caveats for consoles – namely longer than desirable load times. It’s not the best-looking game, especially compared to others, but Prey does its own thing and it does its own thing well.

Prey’s world is run down yet colourful, and the soundtrack perfectly complements the experience. Composed by Mick Gordon, the score is filled with sublime synth beats and strange, otherworldly noises and sound effects to create something eerie, atmospheric and tense. These pieces do an amazing job at elevating the already strong atmosphere aboard Talos-1, and is quite possibly one of the strongest soundtracks I’ve ever heard in a game.

Prey is another win for Arkane. It’s a game where everyone who plays it will have a different experience. One thing is certain though – that Prey remains a consistent experience from beginning to end. Providing players with intuitive gameplay systems with great synergy, freedom to approach combat how you want and game design that rewards creativity are just three ways that Prey succeeds. While BioShock was heralded as the spiritual successor to System Shock, Prey feels like a much more successful attempt. An absolute joy to play and experience.

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Join the free app train: Thames & Kosmos Ubongo

As of late, big names in board games have been adapting the digital ways of milennials and coming out with apps to complement their traditional physical game. From Monopoly to Ubongo, these strategy games are leading the mobile gaming industry with tons of downloads.

And what’s better? 

Now, some of them are available for free! For a limited time only (April 28-30), the Ubongo game app, created by award-winning board game and educational toy manufacturer Thames & Kosmos, will be available for free download on both iTunes and Google Play app stores. With more than 2.5 million games sold worldwide, Ubongo is a fast-paced, addictive and easy-to-learn geometric puzzle game where players race against the timer and against each other to solve a puzzle of interlocking shapes. The faster you solve the puzzle, the more gems you get, and the player with the most valuable gem treasure after nine rounds of puzzle solving wins the game! The companion app features more than 400 engaging puzzles to solve as well.


LEGO CITY Undercover Review

LEGO CITY Undercover was first released in 2013 exclusively to the Nintendo Wii U, with a similar release on the 3DS platform. This release is a port of the original game across all the latest platforms to a sharper, faster-loading version, which also introduces two player co-operative gameplay.


I’ve played many of the LEGO franchise games across a number of different platforms and LEGO CITY Undercover has a very familiar look and feel to its predecessors, in terms of the gameplay and the cutscenes providing the storyline in between gameplay. The game finds our hero Chase McCain returning to LEGO CITY to capture the notorious Rex Fury while also protecting Natalia Kowalski, who has entered a witness protection programme after providing evidence to put him behind bars before he managed to escape.


The first part of the game is heavily driven by cutscenes as it introduces the characters and gameplay to the player. For those familiar with LEGO games this does feel very laboured, as you’re probably itching to get started. That said, this part of the game does set the familiar humorous tone of the game, which in my opinion hasn’t grown tired at all; the detective briefing scene at the start of the game is great and features characters such as Starsky & Hutch, Sherlock Holmes and Columbo. An early level in the game takes Chase McCain to Albatross Island, which looks remarkably like Alcatraz, and the level centres around a plot line featuring numerous references to the film Shawshank Redemption. While some of the humour may be wasted on younger players, the game wouldn’t be the same without it and as an adult player it does maintain interest and puts a smile on your face.


The game may not be challenging to seasoned gamers as it’s not difficult to complete the levels, but there is plenty to explore in the 20 districts of the open-world LEGO CITY, so there’s plenty of longevity. I loved the scanner aspect of the game, which allows Chase to track the bad guys with some pretty neat tech. There are also elements of the city marked with blue and white bricks, which effectively allow our hero to perform some free running and cool slow motion action.


The game is a delight and the game will keep you entertained for hours. The open-world is great to explore and there’s plenty to achieve and unlock outside of the core storyline. There are many great elements to this game, all of which contribute to a great experience, so this comes highly recommended.

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LEGO Worlds Review

Traveller’s Tales have used the LEGO license perfectly by building Lego Worlds as a rival to Minecraft. The game is loosely tied to some rules but has a nice structure in itself to keep the players interested. The premise has the player as a space traveller who gets bumped onto the world and has his ship broken. So, he rebuilds his ship and sets off in pursuit of new words. In the way, he finds out various devices which help in building, replicating and demolishing.


There is Discovery tool which is largely used throughout the game. Just point it to a new object, hit X when it gets highlighted and the item will be added in your vast library of parts and people. You can then deploy these parts and people whenever their need arises. Going on in the game you will also get the opportunity to build an entire world from the scratch. But before that, you will get introduced to and well versed with all the rules, options and controls of the game.


You get to do amazing things and go on adventures including fighting to save a queen or saving cavemen from the wrath of volcanoes. The most amazing thing is that everything that is part of the game world is made of LEGO. So, you have almost entire control and can copy, paint, build, destroy, almost anything you want.


You can do anything you want to. Create a mountain, replicate a castle, or dig out treasure. Sometimes you may get guided by the game, sometimes you will just want to get your hands dirty and create something amazing. But learning to use the tools and getting used to its not so intelligent input manipulation is hard. Your buildings may get fiddly in the beginning, put some time into and you become an expert.

The only flaw in the game is its issue of frame rate and the camera which gets upset in congested areas. It gets especially annoying when you are moving too fast and the game loads up the terrain slowly. In local co-op mode, the game gets really patchy and may feel like everything is just disconnected from each other. But with the gameplay being of a very relaxed nature, it never becomes much of a problem.

The game has a feel that it is the first towards a much greater game. Just some tweaks here and there and Traveller’s Tales might get something outstanding in line. Still, kids can get easily lost in its world for hours and the offline and co-op mode further complement those possibilities. This game is easily a 4 out 5 for its unique experience.

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LEGO Games Walkthrough Event

Written by Crystal Greenwood

I was fortunate to be shown firsthand demos of LEGO Worlds, LEGO Dimensions, and LEGO CITY Undercover on the PS4. If you’ve never encountered a LEGO video game before, these are action-adventure (RPG feel) where you have to figure out puzzles, collect tons of coins and nuts, and, of course, build certain objects to help advance in the story. Each of these games have their signature LEGO interpretation of characters we know and love like Harry Potter, Princess Leia and Spider-man to name a few.

First was Dimensions with The Goonies pack. I feel if any parent my age was able to see how they translated The Goonies into a live, playable gaming experience, you would have goosebumps like I did. Three words sums up what I felt, Chunk’s Truffle Shuffle! The huge attention to detail from the developers shine through with this title, bringing to life something that they would absolutely love to see as a playable medium. Also, with the LEGO Toy Pad, the Sloth, One-Eyed Willy Pirate Ship and the Skeleton Organ minifigs, The Goonies was literally brought to life with impressive interactive gameplay. It doesn’t stop there. If you have other minfigs like Batman, Robin etc, you can still use them in any Dimensions game out there. It was crazy seeing the Batmobile put into The Goonies world while trying to find treasure! Sky’s the limit!

Next was LEGO CITY Undecover. Along with the theme of ’80s style, LEGO CITY Undercover felt definitely like the cliched, cheesy cop flicks back in the day. The cinematic scenes were very nostalgic from the news reporter to the guy-who-has-heard-of-the-lead-character-before-and-idolizes-way-too-much cliche, classic! When we finally got to the gameplay, driving around was great because even though there are linear missions, there are still opportunities to drive around and explore. The great feature is there’s no need for a map because there will always be a trail of coins and nuts leading back to the next advancement of the story. The gameplay was very fluid, engaging and fun. Just a pleasure to demo.

Then, the best was saved for last, LEGO Worlds. My words would probably not do this game enough justice. Even though I was catered to a completely unlocked experience, I was floored with the real-time rendering and how quick someone can seamlessly create whatever they wanted, seemingly out of thin air. In LEGO Worlds, your character is dropped off into a vast of hills and plains. It’s up to you to figure out how to survive and landscape to your liking. There is a mission, but mostly, there’s so much free range in creativity that it might just be forgotten after a while. Just seeing how the duplication gun would scan an object and then reproduce at will without any kind of glitching or buffering whatsoever was absolutely brilliant. Creating castles with lava moats that even takes life from your character was truly amazing as well. The physics were off-the-wall fun, making this title very easy to lose hours and hours on end and not feel a thing.

I walked away from seeing these demos wanting to run to the store and picking them up for myself, especially to play with my 5 year old and have a family night. I highly recommend these titles to gamers of all ranges from occasional to avid because there’s a tutorial in the beginning with each title. This a very important element, helping whomever to just pick up a game stick and start right away. And, with that, Happy Gaming!

Lego Games Event and Overview 

Laat week i was invited to cover a Lego Games event in New York City. The game demos that were being showcased was LEGO Worlds, LEGO Dimensions, and LEGO City: Undercover. 


The 20 minute demo presentation of LEGO City: Undercover showcased the updated version of the game as there were new features that has been added in along with an upscslaled resolution since it is running on current gen consoles (PS4, XBOX One) and i got a chance to try the game and the controls were much more smoother and satisfying this time and it is easy to play with children as well. 


LEGO Dimensions has brand new minatures for the game along with a brand new pack featuring The Goonies and Harry Poter which is releasing on May 9, 2017. Both if which will have their own levels and challenges and cutscenes as well. 


And finally, LEGO Worlds which was originally a STEAM early access game has finally arrived to consoles last week and i got a chance to try it for the first time. It is a very lot like Minecraft and with many updates that are coming along the way, it will be a huge success. I always thought that this is what a LEGO game needed to be where you can create anything you want at any time and now the vision has came to reality with this game. I have a review copy of the game which i will review this week as well. 


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Build or Boom review

The object of Build or Boom is to be the first player to build the plans on the Blueprint Card. Once your building is done, smash your Boomer and your opponent’s structure comes down. If your tower matches exactly what’s on the card, score a point. Replace the blocks in the middle of the table and play again with a new Blueprint Card. The first Builder to reach 10 points wins.

Sounds simple, but is it really? At times, it can be, that is once the game has been played with for a while. Playing the game with my 5 year old, she and her friends struggled to get the pieces set up as pictured and it isn’t so easy to stack quickly with accuracy. For that reason, younger kids 5 to about 7 shouldn’t try to race until they really understand the game. It can be a super fast paced game that helps young children learn to react quickly and come up with some unique ideas, which is a great skill to learn. But, without the dexterity that older children have, it might make it downright frustrating to accomplish.

There’s 50 structures from the Blueprint Card deck to make. Build with speed but keep your buildings balanced. Some of these structures take some pretty careful balance. Ever build something several stories high on top of a cone before? You will now. Or boom goes the dynamite.

The game is well made from strong plastic and the packaging is sturdy. To optimize the game hopefully in future releases, they should rethink the platform by making it a flat concrete looking base and make the box from a cheaper material to cut on cost.

If you love games that are truly interactive, I give build or boom 3.5 out of 5 stars!

Video Game Reviews: Moto Racer 4

If I’m honest I’d forgotten all about the Moto Racer franchise and with good reason, it’s been over 15 years since the third game was released (although there was apparently a Nintendo DS version of the game from the same developers as this). Since then motor racing games have come a long way – be it as side-scrolling stunt games a la Trials HD; or more arcade titles like MX vs. ATV, another survivor of the PS2 era that has been resurrected (somewhat successfully, at least in terms of gameplay) by THQ Nordic; and even motorbike simulations like Ride 2 and Valentino Rossi: The Game – which means Moto Racer 4 has a lot of ground to cover.

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Developed under the supervision of the original Moto Racer designer Paul Cuisset, Moto Racer 4 delivers high-speed races and a white-knuckle ride that gleefully ignores the rules of fair play in favour of ruthless aggression – think Tron‘s light cycles meets Road Rash! I mention those two icons of motorbike racing as those have seemingly had a huge influence on this new racing title: the action is as fast and furious as Road Rash and in a strange design choice, hitting turbo (activated by pulling a wheelie, aka a simple one button press) sees weird light beams fly out the back of your racers outfit a la Tron. And ehen it comes to racing outfits… well, the suits look like they’ve stepped straight out of a Power Rangers/Super Sentai show, right down to a very familiar red body suit and mask!

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Speaking of graphics, they are Moto Racer 4‘s biggest downfall. Whilst ths game has been released on current-gen consoles (and works with PSVR for those lucky enough to afford it) it doesn’t even slightly push current technology – in fact graphically this racer looks like it has been ported over from iOS or Android platforms, it’s that simplistic. In fact Gameloft’s Asphalt 8, made for mobile and tablets, looks more impressive! And the graphics are nothing compared to the terrible controls – oversteering is COMPLETELY unavoidable – and odd physics, which mean that sometimes your bike feels like it’s floating above/off the road and out of your control.

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Thankfully, if the graphics leave something to be desired there is at least plenty of game modes, besides the standard career and quick play/arcade, to go at (not including the VR aspects of the game available to those with PSVR):

  • KING OF THE HILL – Each rider starts with the same time on the clock. While time runs down for the leader, the other racers get extra turbo. The first player to get their counter down to zero wins the race.
  • LAST MAN STANDING – The last player to pass each checkpoint is eliminated.
  • SURVIVAL – The race starts with very little time on the clock. Players gain time by passing the checkpoints. In single-player mode, the aim is to survive for a specific length of time. In multi-player mode, the winner is the last player with time left on their clock.
  • CATCH-UP – The player’s opponents begin the race with a head start and the player must be in first place at a specific time.
  • WOLF PACK – The player begins the race with a head start and must maintain it for a certain length of time without being overtaken.
  • GHOST BIKE – The player starts the race in last place and is not allowed to deviate from the road or collide with others. Finishing in a specified minimum place.
  • GOLDEN HELMET – Competitors must earn the one golden helmet up for grabs during the race. To do this, they must be first past the initial checkpoint. If the player wearing the golden helmet is knocked by another player, s/he surrenders it to that player. If a player falls off their bike, s/he loses the helmet and it is automatically sent to the next checkpoint.

Unfortunately – thanks to the games simple graphics, bizarre physics and dodgy controls – it would seem Moto Racer 4 might be the end of this just-resurrected franchise. If you’re a motorbike game fan and REALLY want to give this one a go, wait till it hits the bargain bins at least.

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Moto Racer 4 is out now on PS4, Xbox One and PC.

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Thoughts about the games on the Nintendo Switch Presentation along with the price and online play.

You have no idea how excited I am for Super Mario Odyssey, of course I haven’t played it so I can’t actually review it, but it easily looks to be the best 3D Mario ever, to me.

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Gorgeous and epic like Galaxy, exploration like 64 and Sunshine. And my favorite 3D Mario games are the open worlded, explorational collect-a-thon types. I miss collect-a-thon platformers. A Hat in Time and Yooka-Laylee have been two of the biggest Console games I’ve been looking forward to thanks to the fact I miss this genre so much. I’ve been waiting with bated breath for A Hat in Time for years thanks to this. (Go check out A Hat in Time, by the way, it’s amazing and it should be on your radar)

This is THE Mario game I have wanted for over a decade. And I couldn’t ask for anything more.

Don’t get me wrong, I love Galaxy, it is so cinematic, beautiful, and fun, with a fun story. But I also really miss the open and explorational Mario type game. And I’ve missed them for a long time. I am so glad we’re going back to them.

Odyssey may even up being my favorite Mario game of all time, and if not that, my favorite 3D Mario at the very least. Yes, even more than 64, even more than Galaxy. Sunshine is literally my favorite mainline series Mario game of all time. And it has bugs and other problems, but I just love the feeling of immersion and exploration and just general relaxing beach fun the game has. And this game looks to be everything I love about that game, and more. I could not be happier right now.

Oh I just want to play it now, this really is going to be the best Mario game ever, isn’t it?

This presentation alone was made amazing for me just for this game.

As for Xenoblade 2 and why I’m so hayped for it, Monolith Soft has always been a little underwhelming in comparison to other JRPG developers aesthetically for how they handle anime aesthetics. They have done a mixture between anime and realism that can be done right in some cases, like how Square Enix did Final Fantasy XIV, but with Monolith Soft, it’s always felt a bit out of sync. Particularly with the faces, the faces have often been a little odd for my aesthetic tastes, at least. This has been the case since Xenosaga at least, before being acquired by Nintendo. And sadly it still exists to a degree for me with Xenoblade Chronicles X.

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Because of this, I had kind of wished they were just go for one or the other, closer to anime or closer to realism or if not, figure out what works.

Of course this is just my personal aesthetic tastes. I don’t mean to offend anyone who thinks that the Xeno series has always had great faces and aesthetic sense. But this has always been a little bit of a disappointment for me for the series.

So to see them just embrace classic anime design and color, I’m very happy. It just looks pretty and like a classic JRPG now. I much prefer this to the fusion look with all of this realistic or gritty or whatever you would call the aesthetic of X. Nothing wrong with realistic or whatever it is they have been adding to the other games. But I kind of just miss the “classic” or “traditional” anime look from Xeno. And I haven’t seen it from the Xeno series since Xenogears.

I love the traditional anime look they’re going back to, it reminds me of a classic JRPG which is something I am so happy to see from Monolith soft again. Makes me feel almost like I’m going to play another Xenogears. Of course, this is totally silly and illogical, it’s just the aesthetic, it doesn’t mean it’s going to be another Xenogears. But watching the trailer and getting these illogical Xenogears vibes feels great. It makes me feel like I’m going to be playing a classic JRPG, and I like that.

I love the character designs. I love the look of the world. I love the voice acting so far. Everything about it looks great.

I also really like that airship town. Reminds me of times playing games like Skies of Arcadia. Again, basically comes back to reminding me of JRPGs I’ve played in older years, from the PS2 and Gamecube era and earlier. And done in a real sense. I feel like I’m not necessarily on the same page with everyone when talking about “classic JRPG” eras. Some of us have different things we liked about classic JRPGs, and I for one love modern JRPGs and have no pretense that JRPGs were this superior. But I do love the sense of pure adventure that I had playing a lot of them.

Adventure, plucky spunky adventure, that’s what I mean. When I look at that trailer, it gives me memories of when I first saw games like Grandia or Xenogears. I would love to play a game that feels like those games again from Monolith Soft. Xenoblade and Xenoblade Chronicles X have great things about them, but they didn’t make me feel like I was about to play something like Grandia again.

I really don’t know better how to explain my hype that that. I miss games like Xenogears and Grandia. And the fact when I watch the trailer it instills that kind of feeling in me has me excited in a way that the original Xenoblade and Chronicles X didn’t. It just has classic JRPG written all over it.

Also, Splatoon 2, do I need to say more? Okay, I have more than 700 hours of my life put into Splatoon for the Wii U and had to literally force myself to stop playing it. It is one of the best games of all time. And if Splatoon is in any way an improvement over the original, then I am in for the time of my life and a dangerous addiction. There are thousands of games I love and Splatoon is probably in my top 20 video games of all time, and I don’t even like competitive shooters. Splatoon is Nintendo’s best franchise in at least a decade and I am an addict. It turned me into an avid fan of a genre I thought I would never enjoy. Ohmigosh Splatoon is just so good. Like I’m not even sure if I can put into words how amazing Splatoon is. Phenomenal? Better than drugs?

So good that I wouldn’t have played any other games all 2016 if I didn’t force myself to put it down once Splatfest stopped. Good bye my life when Splatoon 2 drops.

And speaking of which, one of my other most played Wii U games was Mario Kart 8. I got seriously into that game. In fact, the two together are my most played games. I wouldn’t have even dropped playing Mario Kart 8 religiously if it weren’t for Splatoon. Literally the only Mario Kart game I hold in higher regard than Double Dash and super addictive. There is just so much content and polish in 8 that I cannot help but give it the spot as my number one Mario Kart game.

I was legitimately super sad when Splatoon, Mario Kart 8, and Super Mario Maker stopped getting more content. So I am super enthused that finally we are getting more Splatoon content and moreMario Kart 8 content. These are literally my top 3 favorite and mot played Wii U games and some of my most played Nintendo games of all time.

Let’s not forget Breath of the Wild. I was waiting for more gripping storytelling and narrative elements and this trailer had them. This may be also the best Zelda yet ever, though I’m not totally convinced it will be, I would not be surprised it it were. And my favorite Zelda ever is still A Link to the Past, so that’s saying something. This game might actually surpass a Link to the Past for me. Originally, this seemed like a better version of Skyrim for me, if Skyrim were awesome enough to have superior(to my taste, at least), Zelda character designs and aesthetic sensibilities and themes. Cool, but big roaming sandbox games already leave me overwhelmed. And I often get tired of playing sandbox games with big open fields to explore and want to go play like an RPG with more town and NPC focus. I was worried Breath of the Wild might induce that kind of over-exploration with not enough character interaction experience that has left me burned out before.

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But this trailer really sold me on how epic this game will be. I got to see the darkness and the narrative and how gripping it will be. No longer does it just feel like aimless wandering until you get bored. The game now has a great feeling of narrative and I’m looking forward to it more than ever. Now I’ve seen the emotion behind Breath of the Wild and now I feel invested in it, certainly more than ever before.

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So while I’m not as hype for it as I am the new 3D Mario, Splatoon 2, and Mario Kart 8 Deluxe, it looks pretty good and I’m definitely going to have to give the game a buy and at least 40 hours or so of my time. More than anything, I want to see the story now.

So while some of the games I was looking forward to didn’t show up, the games that did made it super hype for me.

The downside is that, indeed, a lot of the games I wanted to see didn’t show up. Lots of games I would have liked to have heard about. But didn’t make an appearance. I’m talking Nintendo games and franchises that didn’t make a show.

So I can only hope that they make the service really appealing like PlayStation Plus has made their service.

Also, I was really hoping for $250. $300 feels a little high, higher than what I wanted to pay. But I’m locked in now, $300 I’ll have to pay, I guess.

 

Also, Setting up a paywall for online play flies in the face of everything Nintendo claims to be about. So I can only hope that they make the service really appealing like PlayStation Plus has made their service.

Despite the lackluster efforts in the past to engage in online gameplay, I respected Nintendo for keeping their online services free. Nintendo hasalways been about facilitating and encouraging multiplayer interactions with their consoles. From bundling two controllers with the NES, to making 4-player inputs standard with the N64 and even the Switch JoyCons, Nintendo seemed to understand that long-term loyalists could be made simply by allowing friends to play without having to worry about ongoing costs after an initial purchase. I felt that the free online service was simply another facilitation and extension of their core values of bringing people together through gaming.

Splatoon 2 will be completely useless without the service. And what’s worse, is the service will be available for free for the first couple of months after Splatoon 2 comes out and then the trial ends. Are young kids (or their parents) going to pay a monthly bill to continue to play Splatoon after they got to play for free? Smash, Mario Maker, Minecraft, and Mario Kart will also be severely lacking, if not unplayable, if one opts not to pay for the subscription. I think that’s going to be a serious barrier for entry for younger Nintendo fans that want to play online.

Assuming future Pokemon installments will come out for the Switch, will online Pokemon activity require the service? Kind of ruins the camaraderie of the games when many are excluded via real world financial barriers, doesn’t it?

I understand Playstation and Xbox have operated this way for a long time, but that doesn’t make it right. Nintendo has prided themselves with bucking trends in the gaming industry. I’m disappointed they would so blatantly screw fans for a small but steady revenue stream after such a long-standing opposition to such practices. It’s an obvious case of placing shareholders ahead of fans and loyal customers.

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And that’s my long review and basic gist of the presentation, I guess. The highs were pretty high to be honest, but a few really disappointing lows, as well. Though the lows were more about what Nintendo is going to do to my wallet more than anything. I sure am glad I got years worth of Pokemon online and months worth of Splatoon for free, at least. Honestly, I wish Nintendo would make a legit MMORPG, now. So that a Nintendo online subsciption would feel like an MMO subsciption, which, olddly enough, I’m more comfortable with paying than just to play video games online which is free on other platforms.